Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Grappler

New Brewer Today

Recommended Posts

Just got my first kit for Christmas. Followed all instructions carefully. I was wondering, I added the yeast and sealed up the keg. Should I see a foaming type reaction immediately?

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome!

 

No, you won't see any action for 24 - 48 hours.  And the action may be very visible, or not very visible.

 

We recommend 3-4.  3 weeks fermenting with wort temps at 65, 4 weeks in bottles carbonating and conditioning at 70 or higher, and then 3 or more days in the fridge for only the beers you're ready to drink.


Lots of good info in my signature.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Grappler said:

Just got my first kit for Christmas. Followed all instructions carefully. I was wondering, I added the yeast and sealed up the keg. Should I see a foaming type reaction immediately?

 

welcome to the hobby. It's kind of like golf. frustrating at times, but rewarding when you get it right.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Grappler,

 

Welcome, Lots of good information here. 

 

Read @RickBeer signature topics especially the one directed at new brewers.  Don't expect your first batch to be awesome (although is may be).  Time is the best friend of a brewer. The three weeks waiting for your beer to finish fermenting can seem like an eternity.  Then 4 more waiting for carbonation to happen is torture.  Just take that time and read on this forum and learn.  It will improve your brewing.

 

Dawg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Grappler said:

Just got my first kit for Christmas. Followed all instructions carefully. I was wondering, I added the yeast and sealed up the keg. Should I see a foaming type reaction immediately?

 

Welcome, @Grappler. What Rick said.

Temperature control is critical for the yeast. Temps can rise above ambient during the first 3-5 days as the yeast, feed heavily, grow, and multiply. Creates some heat.

Like Rick said, keeping the temp down, 64-65 range, will reduce the chance of off flavors.

Some have a cool room or basement that works. I used a cooler with a frozen pint of water changed out every 12 hours, until I got a dedicated fridge for my fermenters.

Ask away if you have questions or need help.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Grappler, welcome to your newest obsession.  Some people fall out early because their first beer didn't taste great.  Of course, some people quit golf because their first game wasn't negative par.  Use this first beer as an opportunity to learn how to brew, and enjoy what you've created.

 

Please feel free to post questions and/or general fun posts on this forum.  There is a wealth of information here, but we're always willing to answer a question that might have been answered before, especially from Rick Beer's signature.

 

MiniYoda

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the forum and to the hobby.  Stick with it and you will surely brew some great beer.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Temperature control is the key and study. Wealth of information in this forum.

Cleanliness and bottling comes next.

 

Enjoy, M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WELCOME

 

remember yeast are living things and no two batches will likely do the same exact thing. sometimes yeast will start right away eating.. some times it takes a couple days. when i first started  on my first batch i ran here in a panic..

 

OMG I KILLED MY YEAST! BEEN 2 hours and nothing is happening!

 

lol.

 

Then i got spoiled. i started getting foam (krausen) on every batch by 8-12 hours after pitching.  On the batch 4 i ran here posting:

 

OMG! I KILLED MY YEAST! every other batch started in 8 hrs. IT'S BEEN A WHOLE DAY AND NOTHING!!!! stupid yeast!   :P

 

If you did everything right and the temps are good.. and your yeast is alive and happy... you can start seeing something in a couple hours or a couple days.. or not at all. sometimes they go nuts while you arent looking and the krausen drops leaving you thinking nothing happened. that's when you look from the outside at the bottom of the lbk. if you see crud building up, you have fermentation.

 

you will be your own worst enemy in brewing. be patient. learn all you can. take your time to develop your skills. when it starts turning into 'work' it's time to find another hobby. it should be fun and fascinating.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...