Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Fire Rooster

S-04 & US-05 @ Low Temps

Recommended Posts

An LBK is on a basement shelf fermenting a Zombie Clone with S-04 yeast.

LBK won't be disturbed the whole time, and will be bottled in place.

An accurate temperature gauge reads ambient low of 55 degrees and high of 59.

Both S-04 & US-05  have a stated low temperature of 59.

Only 59 degrees has been observed, anytime it is checked. My guess

it briefly goes lower at night when heat is dropped before going to bed.

 

When fermenting 55-59 (mostly 59) for S-04 yeast,

would it be best to ferment 4 weeks instead of 3 ?

 

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Fire Rooster said:

An LBK is on a basement shelf fermenting a Zombie Clone with S-04 yeast.

LBK won't be disturbed the whole time, and will be bottled in place.

An accurate temperature gauge reads ambient low of 55 degrees and high of 59.

Both S-04 & US-05  have a stated low temperature of 59.

Only 59 degrees has been observed, anytime it is checked. My guess

it briefly goes lower at night when heat is dropped before going to bed.

 

When fermenting 55-59 (mostly 59) for S-04 yeast,

would it be best to ferment 4 weeks instead of 3 ?

 

Thanks

 

wouldn't hurt anything...If you can measure your Specific Gravity, that would be good to check, but yeah, just leaving it an extra week won't hurt a thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing to keep in mind is that yeast has an optimum temp range as well as a temp range where they can survive, but it's not optimum.  Anything outside that second range means you'll likely have bad results.  In the functioning, but not optimum range, the yeast has to work harder, i.e. they are stressed.  Stressed yeast, like stressed people, don't operate at their best.  

 

S-05 is "optimal" at 64-82 per the Fermentis site.  It used to say that it was optimal at 59-71.6, and a valid range was 53.6 - 77.  You can often find that printed on pages still, but they changed their website.


So if you go below 53.6 or above 77, then you won't get good results (or the yeast may go to sleep below 53.6).  According to their new info, ideally it needs to be at 64.  So if it was at 55 that is far from optimal and close to the "we're going to sleep" stage.

 

If you're going to vary from the recommended temps, I'd recommend:

 

1) Do a bunch of reading, understanding what might happen for a particular yeast.

 

2) Make sure you know what it should taste like at the proper temp, so you can compare to your below the range temp.

 

3) Think about how you might be disappointed if the result is sub-par, and you now have 20 bottles of beer to drink that are sub-par.

 

Here's the old data sheet: https://www.morebeer.com/images/file.php?file_id=2450

 

Here's the new data sheet: https://fermentis.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/SafAle-US-05.pdf

 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess I'll switch to S-04 yeast for everything, I probably will only do IPA's, Pale Ales, etc.

Have full reign in basement, not so on first floor.  Without any extra/steps/special equipment

I want a yeast to do well in an LBK at ambient 59-61.

Just checked again and it's 59 degrees, but still records low 55.  Must be while I'm sleeping

because morning or afternoon when checked it's 59, summer it's almost always 61.

 

Basement is 1700 sq ft, all open, concrete walls,  8' high ceiling, so if the the LBK wants to heat up it doesn't by much due to thermal capacity.

 

If I start getting great brews (I'm the Judge), will switch to glass bottles and consider all grain.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Fire Rooster said:

Guess I'll switch to S-04 yeast for everything, I probably will only do IPA's, Pale Ales, etc.

Have full reign in basement, not so on first floor.  Without any extra/steps/special equipment

I want a yeast to do well in an LBK at ambient 59-61.

Just checked again and it's 59 degrees, but still records low 55.  Must be while I'm sleeping

because morning or afternoon when checked it's 59, summer it's almost always 61.

 

Basement is 1700 sq ft, all open, concrete walls,  8' high ceiling, so if the the LBK wants to heat up it doesn't by much due to thermal capacity.

 

If I start getting great brews (I'm the Judge), will switch to glass bottles and consider all grain.

 

 

You could try "Cry Havoc" it is an ale yeast that works fine at lager and ale temps and works for either style at the right temp. It has an interesting history too.

It is a lower attenuating yeast too, like S-04.

https://www.homebrewsupply.com/white-labs-cry-havok-wlp862-yeast.html

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Nickfixit said:

You could try "Cry Havoc" it is an ale yeast that works fine at lager and ale temps and works for either style at the right temp. It has an interesting history too.

It is a lower attenuating yeast too, like S-04.

https://www.homebrewsupply.com/white-labs-cry-havok-wlp862-yeast.html

 

 

Something like that might be the answer.

The basement stays within a fairly narrow temperature range year round regardless of arctic blast or heat wave 55-61.

Although I have never seen 55, the gauge records it, so it must be brief, always see 59 or 61 year round.

For now will start in basement 2 weeks, then move to kitchen counter for 1 week where it's upper 60's.

 

It's much easier/efficient to have a yeast that works with my environment, than me trying to create an environment for the yeast.

I have a very large temperature stable basement, that most dont' have, and should be worked to my advantage.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Nickfixit said:

You could try "Cry Havoc" it is an ale yeast that works fine at lager and ale temps and works for either style at the right temp. It has an interesting history too.

It is a lower attenuating yeast too, like S-04.

https://www.homebrewsupply.com/white-labs-cry-havok-wlp862-yeast.html

 

 

Another to consider is Nottingham its rated range is 57-70F. I really like that yeast and it's quite a neutral yeast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Cato said:

Another to consider is Nottingham its rated range is 57-70F. I really like that yeast and it's quite a neutral yeast.

Thank You !, will check that one out also ,and did I mention my basement also has a large sink with running hot/cold water ?

 

http://www.lallemandbrewing.com/en/united-states/product-details/nottingham-high-performance-ale-yeast/

Looks good, and a dry yeast

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Nickfixit said:

You could try "Cry Havoc" it is an ale yeast that works fine at lager and ale temps and works for either style at the right temp. It has an interesting history too.

It is a lower attenuating yeast too, like S-04.

https://www.homebrewsupply.com/white-labs-cry-havok-wlp862-yeast.html

15 hours ago, Cato said:

Another to consider is Nottingham its rated range is 57-70F. I really like that yeast and it's quite a neutral yeast.

Footnote:

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/beer-yeast/

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎1‎/‎20‎/‎2019 at 11:25 AM, Fire Rooster said:

Thank You !, will check that one out also ,and did I mention my basement also has a large sink with running hot/cold water ?

 

http://www.lallemandbrewing.com/en/united-states/product-details/nottingham-high-performance-ale-yeast/

Looks good, and a dry yeast

 

Reading the technical notes on Nottingham I find that it claims that "vigorous fermentation can be completed in 4 days"!!  And "at a lower temperature it is possible to ferment lager-style beers in all-malt wort within 9 days."  Emphasis mine.  Uhhh...really?  I mean, does this preclude the need to wait 21 days with an MRB extract, or no?  Amazing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fermentation is not cleanup.  Yeast cleanup takes some time.  Is Notty quick?  Yes.  Does that mean you can ferment, and have the yeast cleanup, in 7 days?  Maybe 14.

 

Most Mr. Beer brewers don't use a hydrometer, and have no idea when fermentation is done.  Cleanup isn't testable, it's an experience thing.  

 

I go 18 days on my brews, then 3 days cold crash.  Establish a pipeline and time doesn't matter.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

rPipeline.……………..must buy more stuff...……………(pant, pant).

No seriously, I have a lot and have at least 9 months of beer maturing. Today I had Horse's Ass beer from 6/2018. It was very nice and better than at 1, 2, or 3 months.

But it really does work and it takes some time to get it going. Wait for the sales. Keep checking Mr B, Amazon and ebay for discount and stock up..

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...