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After seven weeks, my first taste. I love the color it turned out. The taste is ‘ok’ not as carbonated as I expected/hoped. Although this first bottle was a partial bottle since the batch didn’t come out exactly even. I noticed there was some undissolved goop in the bottom that was the same color as the carbonation drops. So the other bottles may turn out even better. All in all, I figure a pretty decent outcome for my first try. Cheers! 

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they get better as you learn more. the goop was possibly bottle trub. even the tiny bit of sugar we add to carb produces some trub. on pouring do a slow pour and leave the trub in the bottle. if you drink it , no worries. it's actually high in vitamin b and if anything, the yeast will just give you a little stomach distress.  some yeast dont taste great though. which kit was this?

 

congrats on making beer!

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Congratulations! Hope the rest of the bottles turn out really good!

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good job doc....keep it going!

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Thinking (erroneously) that the beer I made didn't have much carbonation after pouring the first glass (740 ml mrb bottle) I decided to give the bottle ONE, Single, mildly firm up & down shake with the cap back on.  I waited a moment, twisted off the cap and began to pour.  Zingo!  3/4+ glass of foam, and I was pouring it correctly!  It did settle down at last, but I still had a thick head of foam about an 1" thick.  Ahhh ----- I can sure be stupid now and then.

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1 hour ago, McSquirrely said:

Thinking (erroneously) that the beer I made didn't have much carbonation after pouring the first glass (740 ml mrb bottle) I decided to give the bottle ONE, Single, mildly firm up & down shake with the cap back on.  I waited a moment, twisted off the cap and began to pour.  Zingo!  3/4+ glass of foam, and I was pouring it correctly!  It did settle down at last, but I still had a thick head of foam about an 1" thick.  Ahhh ----- I can sure be stupid now and then.

Very fortunate, with my beers the bottle would have erupted all over the place if I did that

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1 hour ago, Nickfixit said:

Very fortunate, with my beers the bottle would have erupted all over the place if I did that

it erupted in my glass

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On 1/25/2019 at 6:05 PM, DrDave said:

After seven weeks, my first taste. I love the color it turned out. The taste is ‘ok’ not as carbonated as I expected/hoped. Although this first bottle was a partial bottle since the batch didn’t come out exactly even. I noticed there was some undissolved goop in the bottom that was the same color as the carbonation drops. So the other bottles may turn out even better. All in all, I figure a pretty decent outcome for my first try. Cheers! 

 

 

 

Carbonating in bottles is the same process as fermenting.  Yeast eats sugar (carb drops in your case), produce trub (dead yeast).  Every bottle carbed beer has trub.

 

After refrigerating at least 3 days, gentle pour the first half of the bottle down the side of the glass, then the second half should be poured directly into the center.  STOP pouring when the trub starts flowing, you'll see the stream of beer get cloudy.  You'll leave a small amount in the bottle.  Rinse bottle a few times, then fill with water and let still on the counter while you enjoy your beer.

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4 hours ago, RickBeer said:

 

Carbonating in bottles is the same process as fermenting.  Yeast eats sugar (carb drops in your case), produce trub (dead yeast).  Every bottle carbed beer has trub.

 

After refrigerating at least 3 days, gentle pour the first half of the bottle down the side of the glass, then the second half should be poured directly into the center.  STOP pouring when the trub starts flowing, you'll see the stream of beer get cloudy.  You'll leave a small amount in the bottle.  Rinse bottle a few times, then fill with water and let still on the counter while you enjoy your beer.

This is assuming ideal carbonation. I am not always that good/consistent in result, so my pouring style starts on the side of the glass and migrates to center depending upon foam accumulation.

Also maybe some differences pouring from the PET rather than 12 oz. glass, in1st or 2nd glass from them. The carbonation will be different in each pour.

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On ‎1‎/‎28‎/‎2019 at 5:12 AM, RickBeer said:

 

Carbonating in bottles is the same process as fermenting.  Yeast eats sugar (carb drops in your case), produce trub (dead yeast).  Every bottle carbed beer has trub.

 

 

Rick, does this mean that beer will continue to carbonate as long as it remains in storage after the carbonation phase, until all sugars are eaten? 

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8 hours ago, McSquirrely said:

 

Rick, does this mean that beer will continue to carbonate as long as it remains in storage after the carbonation phase, until all sugars are eaten? 

Sure, thats the process. Thats why you measure how much sugar you put in. So hopefully you end up with “x” volumes of CO2. No big deal for most yeasts. The only time id worry about it is with brett or something that takes a long time to chew on those sugars and will eat them down 110%. Same with saison yeast. I wont bottle condition with saison yeast, i dont trust any calculations

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16 hours ago, McSquirrely said:

 

Rick, does this mean that beer will continue to carbonate as long as it remains in storage after the carbonation phase, until all sugars are eaten? 

 

Yes, until all sugars are eaten, but that's done in a few weeks.  So you won't find that a beer you stored for 4 weeks has lower carbonation than a beer you stored for 12 weeks.

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13 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

Sure, thats the process. Thats why you measure how much sugar you put in. So hopefully you end up with “x” volumes of CO2.

 

Ok, that makes sense - you and Rick are in agreement on this.  Now, I'm wondering if that's the case, wouldn't it make more sense for a brewer to measure Brix and gravity after the carbonation phase and, say,  a couple weeks after that as well?  I ask only because a few of my recipes have come in under the MRB predicted (approximate) abv levels.  (I've also had a couple come in above MRB levels, too).  Perhaps I should run a brix measurement on a portion of one bottle after the conditioning phase - just to see if there was a measurable change.

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No, because there is no measurable change.  If you do the math, you'll see that the minute amount of sugar added to the bottle barely impacts ABV.  Maybe it goes from 5.3 to 5.36.  So what?  I'd say it's not 5.3 anyway because of user-error in reading the hydrometer.

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Here's my thoughts on measuring brix after the 21-day carbonation phase (instead of at time of bottling):

 

MRB (and others) recommend 2 tsp of priming sugar per 740ml bottle.  Multiplying that by the # of bottles (12) gives me 24 teaspoons of sugar (or 24 standard sugar cubes).  That's not an insignificant amount of sugar for just 2 gallons of beer.  Once the yeast devours that, there must be some change in abv, I'd think?

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4 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

No, because there is no measurable change.  If you do the math, you'll see that the minute amount of sugar added to the bottle barely impacts ABV.  Maybe it goes from 5.3 to 5.36.  So what?  I'd say it's not 5.3 anyway because of user-error in reading the hydrometer.

 

Thanks, Rick.  I'll defer to your knowledge rather than my own inexperience.

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4 hours ago, McSquirrely said:

 

Thanks, Rick.  I'll defer to your knowledge rather than my own inexperience.

24 tsp equals about 1/2 cup of sugar.  Plug that into Qbrew and it'll tell you how much of an ABV boost you're getting for the entire batch.  Divide that by the number of bottles and you'll see how much extra alcohol you're getting.  As Rick said, it ain't much.

 

ETA:  I'm at my computer now, so I fired up QBrew.  1/2 cup of sugar is approximately 0.25lbs.  Added to a MRB batch, this equates to 0.5% extra ABV.  Dived by 12 bottles as per your example, that comes out to a whopping extra 0.04% ABV per bottle.  In other words, negligible.  To put it in perspective, in the USA, beer labelled "non-alcoholic" can actually contain up to 0.5% alcohol.

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According to Internet,  1 tsp sugar = 0.15 oz.  So 24 tsp = 3.6 oz.  = 0.225 lb

According to the Brewer's Friend calculator,  0.225 lb of cane sugar in 2 gal brew gives 0.68 % ABV

 

Edit

Ha... Shrike beat me to it.

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Nickfixit said:

According to Internet,  1 tsp sugar = 0.15 oz.  So 24 tsp = 3.6 oz.  = 0.225 lb

According to the Brewer's Friend calculator,  0.225 lb of cane sugar in 2 gal brew gives 0.68 % ABV

 

Edit

Ha... Shrike beat me to it.

 

 

 

So, it really isn't insignificant.  I mean, the beer measured out at 7.02% abv after cold-crashing.  So, IF (big IF) there was a 0.68% gain that'd put the batch at about 7.7%.  But it doesn't really matter.  What does is that it tastes pretty good and actually compared very favorably with a commercial craft beer that sells pretty well here in the NW.  I'm happy.  And maybe I've solved the mystery of what kind of hops I have in the freezer.

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36 minutes ago, McSquirrely said:

So, it really isn't insignificant.  I mean, the beer measured out at 7.02% abv after cold-crashing.  So, IF (big IF) there was a 0.68% gain that'd put the batch at about 7.7%.  But it doesn't really matter.  What does is that it tastes pretty good and actually compared very favorably with a commercial craft beer that sells pretty well here in the NW.  I'm happy.  And maybe I've solved the mystery of what kind of hops I have in the freezer.

 

 

No.

 

It really, truly, actually, factually IS insignificant.  As per my previous post, when two gallons of beer are bottled into 12 bottles and primed with two tsp sugar each, you're effectively getting an added ABV per bottle that is less than 1/10th of what the government allows a non-alcoholic beer to contain.

 

I'll re-phrase:  your priming sugar adds ABV that per bottle is equivalent to less than 10% of the maximum allowed of near bear.

 

I'll re-re-phrase:  would you pour a bottle of Sharp's Near Beer into one of your home brews and think "I've added a not-really-insignificant amount of alcohol to my brew?"  No, you wouldn't.  Firstly, because even though Sharp's contains 0.4% ABV, it tastes like garbage water.  😜 And secondly, because you'd recognize that the ABV gain you'd get from doing so would be very minimal and not worth consideration.

 

That's pretty much the definition of insignificant.

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I'm curious, what did you brew that has 7.1% ABV?

 

Adding .225 pounds of sugar (which is too much IMO), will raise ABV 0.3 to 0.5.  So a 6.9% batch could become 7.3%.

 

More likely, one would want 2.5 volumes of CO2, and add a hair over 1/2 of that.  ABV would go up to 7.1 from 6.9%.  

 

Let's look at some other things.

 

OG 1.060  FG 1.015   ABV = 5.9%

 

Let's say between when you read it and when you bottled it, it dropped to 1.014.  ABV is now 6.0.

 

Or, you read it at 70 degrees for 1.060 and forgot to adjust to your hydrometer's calibration of 60 degrees, so that reading of 1.060 is really 1.061.

 

Of course that 1.060 might actually be 1.0596, and that 1.015 might actually be 1.0154...

 

Not to mention that your measuring of sugar going into the bottle isn't accurate within some tolerance.  

 

Oh, and how do you adjust that Raspberry Wheat, when you added 2 cans of raspberries after fermentation begins and then read the final gravity after it ends?  

 

 

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4 hours ago, RickBeer said:

I'm curious, what did you brew that has 7.1% ABV?

 

 

My variant of Surley Dog, with agave nectar instead honey, (probably too much agave) US-04 instead of US-05, omitting the hops in the wort and dry-hopping with my mystery hops instead, via a hop tea made in a French press, added to the wort 1 week prior to cold crash.  If anything, I used too many of the hop flowers and buds, almost over-powering the malt flavors of the beer.  Initial brix was 18.1 = I.G. 1.075.  Final brix as read after crash was 9.8 = F.G. 1.017.  Plugging those values into the refractometer calculator yielded 7.18%.  I erred when I reported earlier that the two beers were essentially the same at 7.0 (10-Barrel) and 7.02 (mine).  Mine was actually ~7.2, or there abouts....

 

11 hours ago, Shrike said:

It really, truly, actually, factually IS insignificant.  As per my previous post, when two gallons of beer are bottled into 12 bottles and primed with two tsp sugar each, you're effectively getting an added ABV per bottle that is less than 1/10th of what the government allows a non-alcoholic beer to contain.

 

I'll re-phrase:  your priming sugar adds ABV that per bottle is equivalent to less than 10% of the maximum allowed of near bear.

 

I'll re-re-phrase:  would you pour a bottle of Sharp's Near Beer into one of your home brews and think "I've added a not-really-insignificant amount of alcohol to my brew?"  

 

Quick answer on the Sharps: No.  I'd never buy it. lol

2 tsps. of sugar per 24 oz of liquid has to add some abv, however small.  Just so I'm not misunderstood, I'm not looking to boost abv by adding priming sugar.  Just trying to fix CO2 in the beer like I'm supposed to.  Let's agree you and Rick are 100% correct and abv is, in the end, essentially that at cold-crash plus a miniscule amount.  It's the flavor we're all after and somehow, by accident, it turned out pretty good - for an amateur.  And a very in-experienced and confused one at that.  😋

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These were the calculations done with the measured brix readings at kegging and after crash, just prior to bottling my 'Squirrely Dog' experiment.  But no, I did not factor temperature in the readings.  Initial readings done just before pitch and final reading done just prior to bottling, period.

Squirrely Dog.png

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See temperature affects your readings, unless your refractometer has an automatic temperature adjustment feature, your calculations are off, especially if you're doing the FG reading after cold crashing.  

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On ‎2‎/‎4‎/‎2019 at 10:07 AM, RickBeer said:

See temperature affects your readings, unless your refractometer has an automatic temperature adjustment feature, your calculations are off, especially if you're doing the FG reading after cold crashing.  

 

This model is supposed to compensate.  But I'm taking both readings probably within a 5-10 degree window: 1) upon kegging, before the pitch and 2) just before crashing, around 68-70F.  Each sample comes out of the spigot.  Of course, everything's approximate.

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You said "after crash" above.  That's 37 degrees, and that will throw off your reading.  Unless you're warming it up after crashing, which you should NOT be doing.  Make sure you sanitize that spigot before bottling...

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40 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

You said "after crash" above.  That's 37 degrees, and that will throw off your reading.  Unless you're warming it up after crashing, which you should NOT be doing.  Make sure you sanitize that spigot before bottling...

 

Then I spoke incorrectly.  My 'regimen' is to check Brix & Initial gravity after topping the wort in the keg, just before the pitch, then again at Day 14 or 15, and again at Day 18+.  If there's no change in Brix from Day 15 to 18, then I crash.  I do not check the Brix after I put the keg into the fridge, cause I figure I have stopped fermentation (if it hasn't already pretty much stopped on its own).  But I guess I could if I need to, by sampling out some into a shot glass and letting it warm to room temperature first?    I do use a cue tip (dipped in the sanitizer) to swab the inside of the spigot before I bottle - something I saw on a YouTube video which made a lot of sense and is easy to do.

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