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I.C.BEER

priming your beer

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i have been reading alot about how to successfully prime your beer...either using individual bottles or by the batch.. most say do not use regular granulated sugar due to the cidery tase you will get from it..a malt extract or corn sugar and even honey are mentioned to get your beer primed..will corn syrup or maple syrup work as well?

will you get a taste difference use different primers?

.do the same measurment rules apply using different primers?

is it better to batch prime for better end results? :unsure:

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I jumped right into batch priming. Seemed like the easier solution and made more sense to me. So far I've had very consistent results and believe that batch priming is the way to go. At this point I couldn't imagine doing it by the bottle. I'm using corn sugar right now. Haven't had the need to try anything else just yet.

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Corn Syrup and Maple syrup can and have been used. Pretty much anything that is a source of sugar will work for priming and carbonating beer.

You can get some taste differences from different fermentables as priming agents, yes.

Batch priming will always provide the most consistent results possible as it pertains to bottle-to-bottle variation within a batch.

Also... the same measurement rules do not apply across all possible fermentables. Using a good calculator, such as this one will help you see some of the difference in amounts to use between corn sugar, regular table sugar, malt extract and honey. For some of the others, I would use the following as a starting guideline and adjust as necessary to suit your tastes and style preferences:

Honey: Use approximately 40% more honey (measured by weight) than you would use of table sugar... e.g. if you were going to use 1 ounce of table sugar, use 1.4 ounces of honey.

Corn Sugar: Use ~15% more by weight than table sugar

Maple Syrup: Use ~50% more maple syrup by weight than table sugar

Molasses: Use ~80% more molasses by wieght than table sugar

Also, it helps to fully convert the sugars by boiling in a pint or so of water for about 5 minutes and then cooling before doing your batch priming.

Hopefully this gives you some info to get you started.

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thank you for the info.it helps quite a bit..i'm ready to bottle my first batch and i didn't want to ruin it be being overzealous..i would imagine batch priming will cut down on the possibilities of contaminating your brew..again..thank you..btw.this is a great forum of people who seem to enjoy helping others in their brew making..

:cheers: to you all

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I like batch priming just for the time it cuts down on. heh I've got three MrB Kegs and a 5 Gallon that needs to be bottled this weekend. Gonna be a nice couple of hours. ;)

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Good ol' granny-lated sugar is the easiest. And plentiful.

I have batch primed since my second batch. It lets me leave a lot of the trub behind and the carbonation seems to be very even throughout the bottles.
:gulp:

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I.C.BEER wrote:

i would imagine batch priming will cut down on the possibilities of contaminating your brew..

I have recently acquired the materials to batch prime and have done it with one batch. I'm sure others will disagree with me, but it seems although batch priming is far less time consuming than the other method of individual bottle priming, I hold the opinion that there are more possibilities to contaminate your brew. Let me explain.

With standard individual bottle priming, you just have your sugar source (molasses, corn sugar, table, whatever) and your measuring system (Mr. Beer bottling measure, tablespoon, whatever you use). Not a whole lot to sanitize in my opinion.

With batch priming, you have your sugar source, your measuring tool, siphoner, siphoning tube, bottling bucket, bottling bucket nozzle. Seems like more can go wrong with more pieces in a puzzle. Simplicity is the name of my game I guess.

Like I said, other opinions probably vary, and maybe it's because I'm still fresh to homebrewing, but I like the individual bottle priming. Although it is more labor-intensive in comparison to batch priming, there seems to be less chance for contamination, but that's just my opinion.

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I don't batch prime to save time. To be honest, I don't think batch priming is really a time saver. You have to sanitize everything and boil your sugar, transfer to a bottling bucket and let it settle again before you can even start priming.

I batch prime to get the proper carbonation for the style of beer I am brewing and to get a consistent carb throughout all my bottles. Plus it allows me to use different sized bottles without having to calculate different priming amounts based on bottle size.

If you think about it, the next step up from batch priming is kegging, which involves kegs, hoses, taps, seals, gaskets, CO2 additions and exposure to air which all expose your brew to potential nasties. I really think that if you practice proper sanitization techniques, every method is just as safe as the next, but that is JMHO.

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+1 Dr Dink. I think that batch priming can take less time than bottle priming under some circumstances and more time under other circumstances. If I'm bottling in all 1 liter PET bottles, it takes longer to batch prime because I have to get it in the priming container first and putting sugar in 8 or 9 bottles doesn't take much time. If I'm using a lot of smaller bottles, bottle priming takes longer.

But the real benefit from batch priming is ensuring the consistent carbonation in each bottle. And never worrying about whether I forgot the sugar in this bottle (or thinking I forgot and doubling up).

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I'll have to agree with Souldog on this one. I've now primed eight batches and still have no desire to batch prime. I know many brewers in this forum praise this technique (even carb, etc.), but I just don't think it's necessary or matters all that much. The time that it takes to boil the sugar, wait for it to cool, siphon beer into a bottling bucket, then finally siphon the primed beer into the bottles is quite longer than just adding a scoop or two of sugar to each bottle.

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I.C.BEER wrote:

Most say do not use regular granulated sugar due to the cidery taste you will get from it...

I have primed well over 3,000 bottles of beer with Granulated Pure Cane Sugar...
My beer is not cidery.

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thanks for the info. i helps a great deal...i'm looking forward to bottling my firstbatch of canadian pale ale this weekend.. again..i'm new to this site and home brewing..it's good to know that people share this love of cold suds...happy brewing and happy holidays...may santa place a mr beer kit under all your trees...

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ibike4fitness wrote:

I'll have to agree with Souldog on this one. I've now primed eight batches and still have no desire to batch prime. I know many brewers in this forum praise this technique (even carb, etc.), but I just don't think it's necessary or matters all that much. The time that it takes to boil the sugar, wait for it to cool, siphon beer into a bottling bucket, then finally siphon the primed beer into the bottles is quite longer than just adding a scoop or two of sugar to each bottle.

Interesting that you say it doesn't matter "all that much;" especially given that you have not personally tried it.

I'll give you that it's not necessary. The consistency between bottles all from within the same batch, though, is extremely consistent when batch priming; far more consistent than can be reached by priming each individual bottle.

So... is it necessary? Certainly not.

Does it have a very legitimate use and benefit? Most certainly.

I think the reason you feel it does not matter pertains more to your second sentence (a lack of desire to batch prime) rather than the method being poorly founded.

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when you batch prime, is it best to match the exact temp of the priming solution to that of the brew you are ready to prime as not to raise or lower the brew temp.. would there be a certain temp range to stay within?

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I.C.BEER wrote:

when you batch prime, is it best to match the exact temp of the priming solution to that of the brew you are ready to prime as not to raise or lower the brew temp.. would there be a certain temp range to stay within?

Generally, just get the priming solution pretty close to the temperature of the beer which is ready for bottling and you should be all set.

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I toss my priming solution in hot, I have never had any issues. But its probably more advisable to get it close to the temp of the beer. But Im lazy.

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I.C.BEER wrote:

when you batch prime, is it best to match the exact temp of the priming solution to that of the brew you are ready to prime as not to raise or lower the brew temp.. would there be a certain temp range to stay within?

I boil the solution and throw it into the freezer while I sanitize the tubes, bottling bucket and bottles. By the time I am ready to transfer, the solution is at pitching temps.

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Dr. Dink wrote:

I boil the solution and throw it into the freezer while I sanitize the tubes, bottling bucket and bottles. By the time I am ready to transfer, the solution is at pitching temps.

I do the same thing.

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Jimbob wrote:


Interesting that you say it doesn't matter "all that much;" especially given that you have not personally tried it.

I'll give you that it's not necessary. The consistency between bottles all from within the same batch, though, is extremely consistent when batch priming; far more consistent than can be reached by priming each individual bottle.

So... is it necessary? Certainly not.

Does it have a very legitimate use and benefit? Most certainly.

I think the reason you feel it does not matter pertains more to your second sentence (a lack of desire to batch prime) rather than the method being poorly founded.

Thanks for the insight, Jimbob! You're right. I, at the moment, while still using bottles to carbonate my beer, have no desire to even try batch priming. When you're talking about the consistency between bottles being an important reason to batch prime, that's something that's very important to you. We're talking about homebrew here. I'm not entering my beers into any contests; I'm simply brewing as a hobby for my own enjoyment. So, I respectfully stand by argument that to me, I don't think it matters all that much. Now, when I eventually graduate to kegging instead of bottling, I'll definitely be batch priming then. To each his own, but I respect your opinion just the same. Furthermore, I'm certainly not knocking the method one bit.

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I have been priming my bottles with Mutons carb tablets. I use 4 per bottle in most cases the beer carbonates well with a good head, however
some beers and I don't know why end up with a heavy head. They are still
good to drink though. :cheer:

Any one else ever done this??

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Photogiz I just bought some of those yesterday. What size of bottles are you using? I was estimating I would need 12 of those for a 1 liter bottle.

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jungerer wrote:

Dr. Dink wrote:

I boil the solution and throw it into the freezer while I sanitize the tubes, bottling bucket and bottles. By the time I am ready to transfer, the solution is at pitching temps.

I do the same thing.

+1. this works every time for me.

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I use 4 Tablets for a 12 ounce, again most beers seem to do just fine.
It's a simple way. Let me know how your bottles come out after a couple of weeks sitting. Mine sometimes takes a while as my storage room is in the
Low to mid 60's degree.

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I have thought about batch priming and that is about it as far as me & batch priming is concerned.I figure that I don't have the room for all of that extra equipment and I have not had a problem with bottle priming .So I think that in this case I shall stick to bottle priming.

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how bout transferring the fermented brew to a second Mr. Beer fermenter/keg with priming solution added in then bottling to whatever desired bottle size? only $10 for the fermenter/keg alone. just a thought.

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BEEFnBEER wrote:

how bout transferring the fermented brew to a second Mr. Beer fermenter/keg with priming solution added in then bottling to whatever desired bottle size? only $10 for the fermenter/keg alone. just a thought.

I was thinking about doing the same thing for my 1st batch but I have no idea how to siphon the beer in to the 2nd keg or how much sugar to boil 1st, after reading this thread I think I will just start with bottle priming. I’ll really get to see how even or uneven the carbonation is. One question what would make the carbonation un-even is yeast not getting in some of the bottles?

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I attached the MB bottling wand minus the tip to the MB keg and then some 3/8 inch tubing to the wand. Then transfer into a bottling bucket or another MB keg.

You get uneven carbonation from different amounts of priming sugar in each bottle. Even if you use a measuring spoon its tough to get the exact same amount in each bottle.

If you batch prime then you can not only get the same carb in each bottle but its much easier to carb to a specific style by changing the amount of priming sugar by just a few grams.

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Jcmccoy wrote:

BEEFnBEER wrote:

how bout transferring the fermented brew to a second Mr. Beer fermenter/keg with priming solution added in then bottling to whatever desired bottle size? only $10 for the fermenter/keg alone. just a thought.

I was thinking about doing the same thing for my 1st batch but I have no idea how to siphon the beer in to the 2nd keg or how much sugar to boil 1st, after reading this thread I think I will just start with bottle priming. I’ll really get to see how even or uneven the carbonation is. One question what would make the carbonation un-even is yeast not getting in some of the bottles?

Jcmccoy,

Uneven carb is caused by uneven amounts of priming fermentables in the bottle.

Yeast are in suspension in your brew keg.

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crazybrody wrote:

I attached the MB bottling wand minus the tip to the MB keg and then some 3/8 inch tubing to the wand. Then transfer into a bottling bucket or another MB keg.

cool!... so an efficient technique is already being used for batch priming. i take it the wand helps drain the MB keg much faster than the standard valve and without much disturbance, correct?

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If you just have the spigot that came with the kit then this wont work. You would need to purchase this. If you dont have that then you can buy an auto siphon and the correct tubing from any LHBS.

If you just have the standard spigot and dont plan on purchasing these then I would probably bottle prime and bottle from the spigot per the MB instructions.

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crazybrody wrote:

If you just have the spigot that came with the kit then this wont work. You would need to purchase this. If you dont have that then you can buy an auto siphon and the correct tubing from any LHBS.

If you just have the standard spigot and dont plan on purchasing these then I would probably bottle prime and bottle from the spigot per the MB instructions.

got it. thanks for the info.

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just curious... what if you added the priming solution to the fermented keg, mixed it, then bottled it right after? would that stir up and transfer too much unwanted sediment into the bottles? i'm guessing this is a big no-no in bottling?

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i bottles primed for the first time yesterday. I could see why batch priming would be nice because i had a bunch of different size bottles and different length necks. So i don't know how even my car will be but its only WCPA.

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yup, add primer to the bottles and then the beer - invert bottles slowly to stir it up a little and then cap!

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yes beerfan, primer first brew next. If you do it in reverse, you run the chance of the beer foaming up when you add the sugar. doesn't happen every bottle, but enough to be a pain.

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I am new to the technique of batch priming( and most other brewing techniques), so I am going to ask a basic question. When batch priming, what do you do exactly with the sugar and how much do you use? I have seen in posts you boil it, but how much sugar and water do you use and what do you do with the solution after it cools, add it directly to the beer or to the bottling bucket?

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I use 12 ounce bottles with 4 tabs per bottle. I have had a few issues though... some seem to over carb others yake longer and have a very light carb. I have also used the coopers 1 tab for 12 ounces.

Let me know how you made out. :)

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Well, tabs are not batch priming.

The specific answer to your question is, Yes, you CAN batch prime to get the specific amount of carbonation that is true to the style you are brewing.

Here is an online calculator to help you find the right amounts.

Now...having said that...I never do this. I use 7 Tbs of Dextrose for all my batches. I get lots of foam, and I like it that way. I used 6 recently, and the difference was dramatic. Going right back to 7.

I do boil my sugar in about 1/2 cup spring water, but not for fear of sterilization, just to dissolve it good into solution so it will mix well into the beer.

I start siphoning the beer into the bucket, and then when I have a few inches in, gently pour the sugar water in along with the beer. I was pouring the sugar water in first, but some of the water was congealing in the bottom of the buck, and I was not getting my full 7 Tbs worth.

Good Luck.


David

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