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JustEd

WCPA .........yuck

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Could be just me, but I really don't like this mix at all. Drinkable, just not pleasent. IMO, they should really give something a little better as a gimme with the new kits. Thats just me however, I'm sure others like it.

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Mind passing on a few details?

when did you make it

what exactly did you put in it

how long did it set in the keg

what temp did the keg stay at

how long was it in the bottle

what temp were the bottles kept at

how long did they sit in the frige.

Not saying it's the best they got, but a "yuck"?

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i can understand a yuck. first brew i made was wcpa. followed 2-2-2. well, almost. i had to test a bottle after 1 week conditioning, not bad, but not done. checked a bottle 2 days ago, better,with a good head. tried a bottle tonite, flat and no flavor. i guess what i understand is the first batch is practice. i can't wait to taste it in another week. thanks to all the experienced brewers out there coaching the newbies.

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yankeedag wrote:

Not saying it's the best they got, but a "yuck"?


Almost done carbing my first batch of WCPA and tasted on bottling day, it's no Sierra Nevada but it's not exactly Busch Light either...
Even before Carb-ditioning (yea i just made up that awesome word!!!) it was "meh" but not "yuck".... just my dos pesos....

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It's actually one of the ones I like ...you gotta play with it a bit but it takes what you throw at it really well - and it's a great mix to experiment and learn about hops and hopping.

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My wife really liked the WCPA. It wasn't bad after 2 weeks of conditioning, but I just cracked open the last of our first batch that sat for 2 months and it definitely improved over time.

I've gotten into the habit of splitting my batches after they are bottled to put half aside and let sit for no less then a month. While I'm anxious to try them after 2 weeks of carbing/conditioning, they really do get better with a little more time.

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That tends to be the consensus among most people on here about the WCPA. Not that its gross but that it could use a bit more ingredients. I went to 1 of 2 LHBS yesterday to get some hops to add to my first batch and the guy there was a jerk about everything. Had simple questions about everything and all he pretty much did was turn me away and tell me I should come to one of his saturday classes he holds to learn how to brew beer right and not in MR. Beer kegs. While I would enjoy learning to brew beer correctly, at this moment in time, i'm not looking to brew 5-6 gallons of beer! If this was my first experience with learning how to brew I would probably have just given the kit away and said screw it. Anyways, I found another LHBS about 5 miles away and that guy was awesome. He didn't have the hops I was looking for but gave me something he said was comparable. Anyways.... my whole point to this is that i'm looking to change the recipe a bit for the WCPA since what i've heard about it is that it could use a little bit more.

I saw the post somewhere else but no responses..... anyone know what they can compare the WCPA to on the commercial market?

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Droyd2583 wrote:

I saw the post somewhere else but no responses..... anyone know what they can compare the WCPA to on the commercial market?

Sorry, I must have missed the other post. I can sort of answer the question: It tastes alot like Heineken - from the can or keg. (If you want it to be like the bottled Heineken, just age it in the sunlight for a while. Or maybe find some "skunk extract" and put it in :laugh: )

I base that on my try at the Mr. Beer "Import Lager" recipe which consists simply of WCPA, Booster and 1/3 oz. of Argentine Cascade hops (Okay, well that used to be the recipe when I made it. They keep changing the hops around just to mess me up. :angry:;) Now they say Tettnang.) That's pretty close to being just "WCPA." This is the thread where we talked about it. As you'll see, there was another brewer making the same recipe and his report was similar to mine.

Oh, and here's yet another anti-Mr. Beer homebrew store. Been there, done that! Damn that makes me mad. I so wish new brewers didn't have to go through that nonsense to get some help. Of course the homebrew store guy gets what he deserves: no business. Still, I just wish it weren't so hard.

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Hey, hopefully I am not too late here...

This is a WCPA based brew. I was not a fan of WCPA, but this one surprised me. It is actually a modified Golden Harp Ale from the recipe page.

The Golden Calf
---------------
Brewer: David Gilbert
Style: Belgian Blond Ale
Batch: 2.13 galExtract

Characteristics
---------------
Recipe Gravity: 1.069 OG
Recipe Bitterness: 13 IBU
Recipe Color: 11° SRM
Estimated FG: 1.017
Alcohol by Volume: 6.7%
Alcohol by Weight: 5.3%

Ingredients
-----------
Brown Sugar, Light 0.22 lb, Sugar, Other
Candi Sugar, Clear (Belgian) 0.22 lb, Sugar, Other
MrB. Booster 0.81 lb, Sugar, Other
MrB. Pale Export UME 1.21 lb, Extract, Extract
MrB. West Coast Pale Ale 1.21 lb, Extract, Extract

Kent Golding 0.33 oz, Pellet, 1 minutes
MrB. West Coast Pale Ale 1.00 oz, Pellet, 5 minutes


If you don't have the Pale Export, you can easily sub in a pound of light DME. And if you cannot find clear candi sugar, you can sub in invert sugar, which you should be able to find at a bakers store, or at worst, just double the brown sugar.

As I say, I was not a fan of WCPA. But I made this, and it was very popular. It is sweet and light early, but with age, began to taste a lot like Bass Ale.

Have Fun!!

David

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yankeedag wrote:

Mind passing on a few details?

when did you make it - not sure of exact date

what exactly did you put in it - WCPA HME, booster, water, yeast

how long did it set in the keg - 3 weeks

what temp did the keg stay at - 68

how long was it in the bottle - 2 weeks priming, 2 weeks cond

what temp were the bottles kept at - 55-58

how long did they sit in the frige - 2 days

Not saying it's the best they got, but a "yuck"?

Ok, so maybe "yuck" was a bit harsh. But just the straight from the can recipe is not for me. I'm not giving up on it though. I will tinker with it and see what happens. I like the sound of the Golden Calf recipe, and the Cowgirl Honey. Will give one of them a shot.

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next time, store the bottles at about 70*. It will help with the taste. Then put it in the frige. :) That 55 ~58 most likely put the yeast to sleep and it never had a chance to finish the job. :dry:

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I have the Import Lager conditioning now. My intent is to condition for 3 weeks and then move to the beverage cooler for lagering. I plan on lagering it a month while decreasing the temperature by 5 degrees F until I get it near freezing.

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yankeedag wrote:

next time, store the bottles at about 70*. It will help with the taste. Then put it in the frige. :) That 55 ~58 most likely put the yeast to sleep and it never had a chance to finish the job. :dry:

Ahhh, good point!! Many thanks!!


On a side note too, I had a second bottle in the fridge that had been in there for about a week. Drinking it right now and I'm enjoying this one much more!!! Perhaps it was just that bottle, maybe it didn't sit it the fridge long enough, I don't know. Still not my favorite, but the bottle is now empty and I'm feeling pretty good about it.

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Ummmmm,I don't want to sound stupid, but, other than the obvious(WCPA, and others), how do you know if you are making an ale or a lager??

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pretty much by the yeast you use. an Ale yeast ferments at the top of the wort, a Lager ferments from the bottom. Temp wise, the Ale likes a warmer temp where a Lager works at cooler temps and takes longer than an ale to ferment.

I just did my first Lager and it took about 71 days to get to bottling time.

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JustEd wrote:

Ummmmm,I don't want to sound stupid, but, other than the obvious(WCPA, and others), how do you know if you are making an ale or a lager??

Ale is fermented warm, Lager is fermented cold. Since Mr. Beer is fermented warm they are ales. I don't know why they have names like Cowboy Lager and Vienna Lager since they are not really lagers.

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norman1 wrote:

JustEd wrote:

Ummmmm,I don't want to sound stupid, but, other than the obvious(WCPA, and others), how do you know if you are making an ale or a lager??

Ale is fermented warm, Lager is fermented cold. Since Mr. Beer is fermented warm they are ales. I don't know why they have names like Cowboy Lager and Vienna Lager since they are not really lagers.

It is like yankeedag states "...depends on the yeast."

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JustEd wrote:

So all of Mr. B stuff are ales?

Yes, if you use the standard yeast under the lid or another ale yeast and ferment and carb and condition at 70 degrees F.

No, if you use a lager yeast, ferment, carb, and codition at a lower temperature, example: 53 degrees F, and lager near freezing.

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"I base that on my try at the Mr. Beer "Import Lager" recipe which consists simply of WCPA, Booster and 1/3 oz. of Argentine Cascade hops (Okay, well that used to be the recipe when I made it. They keep changing the hops around just to mess me up. Now they say Tettnang.)"

I may be mistaken, but I think Argentine Cascades were bred to be a Tettnanger substitute.

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I may be mistaken, but I think Argentine Cascades were bred to be a Tettnanger substitute.


Yes and no. They ARE pretty dang similar in character to Tettnanger, but they weren't bred for that. In fact, they are not really "bred" for anything. They are the same plants that are grown in Yakima... just different terroir...

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Droyd2583 wrote:

I saw the post somewhere else but no responses..... anyone know what they can compare the WCPA to on the commercial market?

that was probley the post i put
listed at taste test
http://community.mrbeer.com/index.php?option=com_kunena&Itemid=58&func=view&catid=8&id=41832

but thanks for all the good info
its only been in keg 6 days and i went by directions as is my first brew

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