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ewildcat7

fermenting times

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I have noticed that the Mr. Beer recipes say to ferment the beer for 3 weeks for bottling.  But the Coopers recipes say to use a hydrometer to do gravity tests after 7-10 days and, if stable over 2 days, then to bottle.  Is this simply a case of Mr. Beer trying to make things simpler and not bother with using a hydrometer?  Or is there really a difference in the products?

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No difference in products.

 

We recommend 3-4.  3 weeks fermenting, ideally with wort temp of around 65, followed by 4 weeks in bottles carbonating and conditioning at 70 or higher.  Then 3 days in the fridge for what you are ready to drink, leaving the rest to continue to condition.

 

You could go 14 days, then take hydrometer readings 24 hours apart.  The full 21 days ensures the yeast has time to cleanup, which you cannot measure with a hydrometer.

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12 hours ago, RickBeer said:

No difference in products.

 

We recommend 3-4.  3 weeks fermenting, ideally with wort temp of around 65, followed by 4 weeks in bottles carbonating and conditioning at 70 or higher.  Then 3 days in the fridge for what you are ready to drink, leaving the rest to continue to condition.

 

You could go 14 days, then take hydrometer readings 24 hours apart.  The full 21 days ensures the yeast has time to cleanup, which you cannot measure with a hydrometer.

 

thank you - this certainly simplifies things (although makes me wait an extra week)!

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Brewing requires patience.  Build that pipeline!

 

pipeline.jpg.3eaf898ff3f9c6ae85fde7e4a87a6ea3.jpg

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I asked the same question on the Coopers' message board and got the following response:

 

"Just do what you normally do. An ale shouldn't take any longer than 7 days to reach FG. Add a few days for yeast cleanup and you can have it bottled after 11-12 days, 2-3 weeks to carbonate as normal."

 

So, I am very confused now as to what to do.....

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12 minutes ago, ewildcat7 said:

I asked the same question on the Coopers' message board and got the following response:

 

"Just do what you normally do. An ale shouldn't take any longer than 7 days to reach FG. Add a few days for yeast cleanup and you can have it bottled after 11-12 days, 2-3 weeks to carbonate as normal."

 

So, I am very confused now as to what to do.....

The "3-4" apparently came about as a result of the experiences of many veteran MRB brewers on this forum.  Yes, you can bottle after 11-12 days.  But their results indicated that going three weeks led to a better beer.  I do all mine for three weeks (or on rare occasions when I'm able to cold crash, 18 days plus three cold crashing.)

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I think I am going to "split the difference" between 1 and 3 weeks.  I will take a gravity reading after 2 weeks and then again 2 days later.

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1 hour ago, ewildcat7 said:

I think I am going to "split the difference" between 1 and 3 weeks.  I will take a gravity reading after 2 weeks and then again 2 days later.

Are you using ale yeast? What temp are you fermenting at?

 

if i were you... i would ferment my ALE at 65 and then on day 13 or so bring it up to 68 for 24 hours. Then cold crash for 2-3 days if youre bottling and not kegging. 

 

Can you ferment a beer in 7 days? Yup. But mostly with precise temp control and gravity readings. The “clean up” is for diacetyl. Yeast will ferment the beer in 7 days but it also creates a bunch of compounds that are undesirable in the process. After the yeast eats all the simple sugars, it looks for other food. So by raising the temp youll keep them from getting sluggish after eating the simple sugars and encourage them to keep on keeping on. So theyll eat the other compounds which will keep diacetyl out of the finished product. 

 

Can it be done in a week? Yes. But it would be a shame to ruin a whole batch because you’re impatient. At least go two weeks. Three is better until you can monitor the exact temps and gravity. No two batches are the same. Yeast is a living being, they do what they do when they want. 

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13 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

if i were you... i would ferment my ALE at 65 and then on day 13 or so bring it up to 68 for 24 hours. Then cold crash for 2-3 days if youre bottling and not kegging. 

 

I used S-04 ale yeast and have been fermenting at 64 degrees; today is day 14.  So, I am almost following your suggestion perfectly.  I can bring it up to 68 right now and then cold crash tomorrow for 3 days and then bottle.

 

If I am reading what you wrote correctly, if the beer ferments in 7 days, then taking gravity readings on day 14 and 16 seems pointless (and a waste of some beer) because it will almost certainly be redundant in showing that fermentation is complete.  Do I have this correct?

 

thank you

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30 minutes ago, ewildcat7 said:

 

I used S-04 ale yeast and have been fermenting at 64 degrees; today is day 14.  So, I am almost following your suggestion perfectly.  I can bring it up to 68 right now and then cold crash tomorrow for 3 days and then bottle.

 

If I am reading what you wrote correctly, if the beer ferments in 7 days, then taking gravity readings on day 14 and 16 seems pointless (and a waste of some beer) because it will almost certainly be redundant in showing that fermentation is complete.  Do I have this correct?

 

thank you

Some people say the number one rule in brewing is sanitation.  I thinks its "know what youre doing, and why youre doing it"

 

You technically don't know if your beer is done fermenting until you take a gravity reading.  I would also add that you can do a fairly simple diacytel test at home to ensure the beer is ready to be packaged.  If the beer is done at day 7 and also tastes good and passes the diacytel test, then its good to package.  It will not harm it to go another week or even two.  So, yes, another reading at day 14 is pointless.  But remember, attenuation (average % of sugars a yeast will eat) is only an average.  Two readings are needed to prove the yeast is done eating.  Keep in mind some yeasts are notorious for stalling out at any point and may test the same for days before finishing the job. 

 

Im an honest man.  I only kinda go by days fermenting.  But Ive also been doing this for almost 6 years.  Every beer ive ever made has produced a krausen of varying degrees.  Some much more larger than others.  I pitch yeast, ferment, krausen appers for days then it falls.  when it falls, I raise the temp for a day or three until im ready to keg.  Keep in mind I keg, It wont explode like bottles would if you aren't careful. I generally go no less than 14 days because I try to only do brewing things on the weekend.  So 14 days fits right into my schedule.  If I don't get to it, then ill go 21 days.  Doesn't affect the beer in the slightest.  Also remember that dry hopping kicks up another mini fermentation, so don't dry hop and then bottle immediately.  Know what youre doing and why youre doing it.  US-04 is usually a quick mover but if your krausen fell yesterday then its probably not ready. 

 

Temperature is a tool, and also a measurement in brewing.  At 65 degrees things happen fast.  At 35 they happen slow.  At 75 they happen too fast for most ales.  Don't cold crash until youre sure the beer is done because youll either a) get exploding bottles due to imcomplete fermentation or b) lock in undesirable flavors.  Carb the beer for 4 weeks and then decide what you want to do from there.  Cold storage will preserve flavors and keep beers fresh while keeping your stored bottles at 70 degrees will age them for the better or worse.

 

Its been a long time since I posted any useful advice.  That's why Im goin on a tangent  

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