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Creeps McLane

A Place for Kegging Questions

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@Bonsai & Brew @Big Sarge @RickBeer

 

Here we go, new thread.

 

i just went down stairs and measured everything

 

temp of keezer- 35

co2 setting on regulator- 7 psi

length of beverage line- 24”

volumes of CO2- 2.32

 

i poured a beer at 7 psi, inch head on a sour that quickly disappeared. Beers tastes perfect. So actually, my serving psi is my carbing psi. 

 

Think im crazy? Come over and have a beer with me and I’ll prove it. No foaming issues, beer tastes great, pours at a full speed, sometimes I dial it down to 5 on the regulator but 90% of the time I don’t touch the thing. 

 

I fully understand why you’d want more resistance in the line, but for whatever black hole of space I live in, 2’ of hose is perfect.  My buddy always uses picnic taps at his house. They’re probably 5’ hoses I’m guessing. 10’ seems obnoxious 

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I don't think you're crazy. As a matter of fact, is love to invite you over for some beer while we discuss the craziness going on in my system. I'll chime in with more later, once I get home. 

Thanks for starting the new thread!

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Wonderful. To add to my frustrations, came home to frozen beer lines. They thankfully thawed quickly which is good, because I'm thirsty. 

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Current pour. Head forms during the pour, usually just over an inch once I cut the tap off. Of curious note, it eventually settles with those cascading nitro-esque bubbles. A thin head persists throughout, but the carbonation is very low. I can barely observe a few bubbles rising occasionally. The carbonation mouthfeel is a light tingle, no bite. I'm not looking for overcarbed, knowing that we historically start out with carbonation on the high end when bottle/batch priming our homebrew with sugar. I hone my senses in on just the carbonation, trying to make sure I'm not misreading it. 

image.jpeg

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1 hour ago, Creeps McLane said:

@Bonsai & Brew @Big Sarge @RickBeer

 

Here we go, new thread.

 

i just went down stairs and measured everything

 

temp of keezer- 35

co2 setting on regulator- 7 psi

length of beverage line- 24”

volumes of CO2- 2.32

 

i poured a beer at 7 psi, inch head on a sour that quickly disappeared. Beers tastes perfect. So actually, my serving psi is my carbing psi. 

 

Think im crazy? Come over and have a beer with me and I’ll prove it. No foaming issues, beer tastes great, pours at a full speed, sometimes I dial it down to 5 on the regulator but 90% of the time I don’t touch the thing. 

 

I fully understand why you’d want more resistance in the line, but for whatever black hole of space I live in, 2’ of hose is perfect.  My buddy always uses picnic taps at his house. They’re probably 5’ hoses I’m guessing. 10’ seems obnoxious 

I think the goal of balancing is to have your carbing pressure equal your serving pressure. That ensures consistent target carbonation is maintained throughout the life of the keg. I'm usually looking at about 10 psi for carbing, keeping it easy at 2.5 volumes CO2. My beer wasn't pouring well at that pressure, though. That's why I've been chasing the beer line length. I don't want long lines in the fridge (6.5 ft currently, tried 10 ft previously based on online calculators), I just want a good pour. Temperature is known and was (before the freezing lines) pretty consistent. When I set the carbing pressure for my first batch, sat there at two weeks on gas, at temperature, the pour came out slow and the beer was very flat. I hate that I can't verify proper operation of my regulator. It's a Kegco regulator, but still a hand me down. 

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27 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

I think the goal of balancing is to have your carbing pressure equal your serving pressure. That ensures consistent target carbonation is maintained throughout the life of the keg. I'm usually looking at about 10 psi for carbing, keeping it easy at 2.5 volumes CO2. My beer wasn't pouring well at that pressure, though. That's why I've been chasing the beer line length. I don't want long lines in the fridge (6.5 ft currently, tried 10 ft previously based on online calculators), I just want a good pour. Temperature is known and was (before the freezing lines) pretty consistent. When I set the carbing pressure for my first batch, sat there at two weeks on gas, at temperature, the pour came out slow and the beer was very flat. I hate that I can't verify proper operation of my regulator. It's a Kegco regulator, but still a hand me down. 

I just went back and looked at a don osborn video for his kegerator. Looks like in his fridge he has about 5’ lines and in the comments he says he keeps his regulator set at 10. 
 

i dont really think 18” would make yours pour significantly slower at 10 psi than his. A keg at 32 degrees for two weeks at 10 psi should be carbed, it shouldve been carbed in half that time. Do you have any other gas guage? To test the regulator out on? 
 

When i first set up my keezer i was also freezing lines. I just turned it up a hair. Also, my johnson controller is horse shit. I set it at 35 and im freezing lines. Its set at 40 i think and the keezer temps at 35. Thats pretty important too. I keep a thermometer in the compressor step part of the keezer at all times. If youre freezing lines, you gotta be less than 30 degrees cuz beer freezes at a lower temp. Also, perhaps theres chunks of frozen ice in the line blocking it? Do you have a spare picnic tap? Hook it up and pour a beer maybe?

 

to reduce foam- lower temp or change line length right? Id have to read ricks link to see if youd have to increase or decrease the line length. 
 

too violent of a pour?- Possibly overcarbed or decrease serving/ carbing pressure. Prob disconnect gas altogether until it mellows out 

 

Massive head but still flat?- over carbed. From my experience, an uncarbed beer will yield no head at all. 
 

2 weeks in the keezer at 10 psi and not carbed- equipment failure. Has to be. No other reason i can explain that other than your keezer is room temp. 

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4 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

I just went back and looked at a don osborn video for his kegerator. Looks like in his fridge he has about 5’ lines and in the comments he says he keeps his regulator set at 10. 
 

i dont really think 18” would make yours pour significantly slower at 10 psi than his. A keg at 32 degrees for two weeks at 10 psi should be carbed, it shouldve been carbed in half that time. Do you have any other gas guage? To test the regulator out on? 
 

When i first set up my keezer i was also freezing lines. I just turned it up a hair. Also, my johnson controller is horse shit. I set it at 35 and im freezing lines. Its set at 40 i think and the keezer temps at 35. Thats pretty important too. I keep a thermometer in the compressor step part of the keezer at all times. If youre freezing lines, you gotta be less than 30 degrees cuz beer freezes at a lower temp. Also, perhaps theres chunks of frozen ice in the line blocking it? Do you have a spare picnic tap? Hook it up and pour a beer maybe?

 

to reduce foam- lower temp or change line length right? Id have to read ricks link to see if youd have to increase or decrease the line length. 
 

too violent of a pour?- Possibly overcarbed or decrease serving/ carbing pressure. Prob disconnect gas altogether until it mellows out 

 

Massive head but still flat?- over carbed. From my experience, an uncarbed beer will yield no head at all. 
 

2 weeks in the keezer at 10 psi and not carbed- equipment failure. Has to be. No other reason i can explain that other than your keezer is room temp. 

So all of the damn calculators said that 10' is what I needed, except on basic one that made a lot of sense. It said 5.5' so I played it safe and went 6.5' just in case. I think the pour at 6-10 psi is a decent rate. It's not too fast and not too slow. So I think. I've seen the violent pour and this just isn't it. 

I'm really concerned about the set and forget at 10 psi resulting in no carb and not enough pressure to push through the 10' line. My first worry was the sanke keg (my first time using), the sanke tap converted with ball lock connectors, and leaks. I ruled out the gas leaks with heavy spraying on StarSan all over that mofo. I'd love to get a new regulator, but I want to use limited money more effectively. I know, that's a poor answer. I also just spent money on an Inkbird for the fermentation fridge and can't justify a second one for the kegerator. I'm unfortunately relying on the fridge thermostat (without any verification besides temp readings of beer). 

I have a picnic tap that was handed down with the 3 gallon corny, but I don't trust it. It has a black spot midway through the line. I think it's 3' long. I've thought about giving it a try though. 

I've graduated from the massive head, thankfully. That bad boy was 90% head in the glass at one point. I think I'm close on line length and hopefully pressure. I want to try kicking a carbonation pressure of something like 15 psi for a week, dropping it to around 8 psi serving, and seeing how that does. On the next batch. 

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@Big Sarge just another thought. Did you test the keg itself for leaks? I always set the psi to 20 to set the o ring but sometimes it still leaks later in life. That could explain why the headspace co2 is less and why its not reaching the correct carb level. 
 

ill go back to reading your above post now

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I check at initial hookup. I could probably stand to check throughout the duration, at least with the corny and its gaskets. 

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@Big Sarge ok. To be honest, im confused. Reading that it sounds like all the odds are against you. You have no reliable equipment, but then you say “youre close”. Are you really or are you just trying to be optimistic?

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3 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

I check at initial hookup. I could probably stand to check throughout the duration, at least with the corny and its gaskets. 

Have you ran out of gas at an obnoxious pace? What kind of ball lock disconnects are you using? I have all CM Becker cuz theyre the best. Ive had keg king ones before and they leak and then they dont, then they do, then they dont. Theyre in the landfill now. Good riddance. I know you’ve used starsan to check your connections but is everything a barb fitting or is there some janky pipe to flare to barb or something going on? And swivel connections? Bump those things and theyll start leaking immediately. Tighten a nut 6’ from that connection and itll leak. 
 

anywho, are you more lost or are you more close to your goal?

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8 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

@Big Sarge ok. To be honest, im confused. Reading that it sounds like all the odds are against you. You have no reliable equipment, but then you say “youre close”. Are you really or are you just trying to be optimistic?

Yes. Until I can get a new regulator, I'm going to adjust as necessary and record my results along the way. I need to get right before adding a manifold and another shank. For reals. 

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4 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

Have you ran out of gas at an obnoxious pace? What kind of ball lock disconnects are you using? I have all CM Becker cuz theyre the best. Ive had keg king ones before and they leak and then they dont, then they do, then they dont. Theyre in the landfill now. Good riddance. I know you’ve used starsan to check your connections but is everything a barb fitting or is there some janky pipe to flare to barb or something going on? And swivel connections? Bump those things and theyll start leaking immediately. Tighten a nut 6’ from that connection and itll leak. 
 

anywho, are you more lost or are you more close to your goal?

I'm good on gas, solidifying my no leaks claim. It was a little concerning after carbing and serving only three legs, but I have screwed around with so many different pressures with associated bleeding and filling, I think it's ok-ish. The ball lock disconnect brand is unknown, more hand me downs. I'll make note of your preference, as I want to order more down the line during expansion. The connections at the ball lock connector end of both lines are barbs with swivel (screw on?) nuts. I've discovered leaks on the beer line (quite obvious) and used thread tape to fix them. They seem pretty well off, although I should check them again. 

I'm trending towards figuring it out, although I feel so lost. 

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16 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

I'm good on gas, solidifying my no leaks claim. It was a little concerning after carbing and serving only three legs, but I have screwed around with so many different pressures with associated bleeding and filling, I think it's ok-ish. The ball lock disconnect brand is unknown, more hand me downs. I'll make note of your preference, as I want to order more down the line during expansion. The connections at the ball lock connector end of both lines are barbs with swivel (screw on?) nuts. I've discovered leaks on the beer line (quite obvious) and used thread tape to fix them. They seem pretty well off, although I should check them again. 

I'm trending towards figuring it out, although I feel so lost. 

No teflon, you should just need a swivel nut washer. 

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10 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

No teflon, you should just need a swivel nut washer. 

That's the rubber gasket that fits between the swivel nut and ball lock connector?

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5 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

That's the rubber gasket that fits between the swivel nut and ball lock connector?

Yes, a good disconnect will have a washer built in. 

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4 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

Yes, a good disconnect will have a washer built in. 

I saw them and figured I would try without, in case they were an unnecessary waste of money. Hindsight is 20/20 of course. 

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A. @Creeps McLane I''m on my way over to have a beer with you so you can prove your theory. have my glass ready please. only be about 18 hours and i'll be there.

 

B. 2 cents from limited kegging experience, but enough to have an opinion. using the keg in the fridge with the picnic tap, I would carb for a week at 12 psi.

then, when ready to serve, i would turn down the psi's to 6 or 7, bleed the pressure from the PRV and serve perfectly with the picnic tap, which is very short.

 

fast forward to a keezer, or kegerator. I am using 10' lines not b/c some "guy at the store" said so, but i called my LHBS and talked with the guys who know what they're talking about and they told me 10' line is the way to go. i haven't been adjusting the carbing pressure in the keezer (still at 12 or so) and it pours like a charm, like at a bar. keezer inkbird set at 36 deg.

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1 hour ago, Big Sarge said:

the sanke tap converted with ball lock connectors

@Big Sarge im going to buy a sanke tap and i can't wait. the breweries around me sell smaller kegs of great brew that could fit in my keezer. i'll have some craft commercial and home brew on tap!

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I don't regret buying the ball lock conversion parts for the sanke tap. They are money when you have to swap between corneys and sankes. I lucked out and got a 5 and 7 gal sanke with my garage sale kegerator purchase. 

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newer pic of my keezer. ipa and stout on tap. blueberry wheat on the co2. haven't connected it to a tap yet. could fit a 4th keg in there and i will soon. 

keezer3.jpg

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I obviously have some kegging issues I'm trying to get straight before getting too far down a rabbit hole, but I was wondering if anyone bottles from their keg? Is a beer gun needed? I've seen taps that you can hook up and gas line to for bottling straight from there. I've also seen methods not requiring additional fancy equipment. 

I'm merely inquiring for conversation and potentially attempting down the road. 

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No, you do not need a beer gun.  Think of how a growler is filled.  A piece of tubing is put on the tap, sits at the bottom of the growler, and fills from the bottom.  Keep in mind, that's for something that is going to go flat in a few days.  And, of course, the growler is full of oxygen, and that beer is going to oxidize soon.

 

A beer gun allows you to purge the bottle of oxygen with a shot of CO2, then fill it.  That's why it can last longer.  

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Makes sense. What kind of shelf life would you put on a co2 purged, tap/gun filled bottle of beer? 

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3 hours ago, Big Sarge said:

I obviously have some kegging issues I'm trying to get straight before getting too far down a rabbit hole, but I was wondering if anyone bottles from their keg? Is a beer gun needed? I've seen taps that you can hook up and gas line to for bottling straight from there. I've also seen methods not requiring additional fancy equipment. 

I'm merely inquiring for conversation and potentially attempting down the road. 

One thing to mention with filling from the tap line, is sanitation. I have a ball lock disconnect that screws right into my tap but id never bottle a beer from it cuz I dont trust the tap being clean like my beer gun is. I also have a growler filler attachment for my taps which you could fill a bottle with like @RickBeer said but its not the ideal way to do it. 

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13 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

One thing to mention with filling from the tap line, is sanitation. I have a ball lock disconnect that screws right into my tap but id never bottle a beer from it cuz I dont trust the tap being clean like my beer gun is. I also have a growler filler attachment for my taps which you could fill a bottle with like @RickBeer said but its not the ideal way to do it. 

So you have a beer gun and pretty much swear by it? I can see your concerns about sanitation. I've also seen some crazy setup where someone sticks a bottling wand in a cobra tap, turns the pressure way down, and does it like that. I'd like a beer gun down the road, but I can't quite justify the need just yet. 

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39 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

So you have a beer gun and pretty much swear by it? I can see your concerns about sanitation. I've also seen some crazy setup where someone sticks a bottling wand in a cobra tap, turns the pressure way down, and does it like that. I'd like a beer gun down the road, but I can't quite justify the need just yet. 

Ive had the last straw and i now have the blichmann beer gun. I like blichmann better. 

Blichmann Beer Gun
https://youtu.be/MOHQ39iTxyI

 

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I've pretty much seen both. I know that benefit of co2 purging a vessel and figured the beer gun was the way to go. I'm not gonna lie; kegging has made me lazy. I still want to share with people, though. I'd rather use the gun than bottle and prime, although I'm sure there are conditioning benefits for some beers. 

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4 hours ago, Big Sarge said:

So you have a beer gun and pretty much swear by it? I can see your concerns about sanitation. I've also seen some crazy setup where someone sticks a bottling wand in a cobra tap, turns the pressure way down, and does it like that. I'd like a beer gun down the road, but I can't quite justify the need just yet. 

I tried that with very poor results but will undoubtedly try it again after making sure to cool down the wand first.  I also had too much pressure which resulted in a bottle 3/4s full of foam.  Again, I need more practice with all things kegging.

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3 minutes ago, Bonsai & Brew said:

I tried that with very poor results but will undoubtedly try it again after making sure to cool down the wand first.  I also had too much pressure which resulted in a bottle 3/4s full of foam.  Again, I need more practice with all things kegging.

Live and learn. I guess I'll concentrate on getting kegging right first lol. 🍺

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1 hour ago, Big Sarge said:

Live and learn. I guess I'll concentrate on getting kegging right first lol. 🍺

ok, i can dispel the myths in one post. i bottle a lot from my kegs and give beer away. the key is to put your bottles into the fridge 1st. i sanitize them, and put a piece of sanitized foil on top of the opening. let it get fridge temp, and then turn down the pressure, pull the PRV and fill your bottles. just bottled a sixer for a friend yesterday and that worked like a charm.

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15 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

One thing to mention with filling from the tap line, is sanitation. I have a ball lock disconnect that screws right into my tap but id never bottle a beer from it cuz I dont trust the tap being clean like my beer gun is. I also have a growler filler attachment for my taps which you could fill a bottle with like @RickBeer said but its not the ideal way to do it. 

 

Many owners of kegging systems don't practice good sanitation.  Proper cleaning of the lines is necessary, as well as regular disassembly of the entire faucet, clean and sanitize, then reassemble.  I had some very experienced brewers tell me that a certain high end tap was not able to be disassembled.  I then sent them a picture of it disassembled, and they were astonished...

 

The manual that I posted a link to (and will again below), recommends cleaning the lines every 14 days.  Among other things, each faucet should be rinsed with clean water at the end of the day and if you have faucet plugs they should be stored in a glass of sanitizer and then inserted into the faucet at the end of the day.  99/100 homebrewers don't do that, maybe 999/100.  

 

Page 54 talks about faucet hygiene, starting at page 55 it discusses system maintenance and cleaning, including replacement of plastic lines every 1 to 2 years.  http://www.draughtquality.org/wp-content/uploads/DBQM17.pdf

 

Keep in mind that a pub or brewery pours very often, which flushes lines and faucets.  Homebrewers don't, which makes it even more necessary to focus on good sanitation.

 

This is the main reason that I haven't switched to kegs.  Between my wife and I, we don't consume enough beer to make it worth the effort to maintain a kegging system, not to mention the wasted beer that would result from cleaning the system properly on a regular basis.  That's why I stick with bottling.  That may change in retirement, coming soon, we'll see.

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@RickBeer Thanks. I have seen a lot of literature on sanitizing and cleaning draught systems. I can tell you firsthand that the faucets harbor some nasty stuff. When I first bought my (used) kegerator, the first thing I did was disassemble the faucet and replace the beverage lines. The internal parts of that faucet were disgusting! Let's just say I'm glad it's something that I didn't overlook. I knew the guy who had it previously (not a homebrewer) probably didn't pay attention to it much. 

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Just now, Big Sarge said:

@RickBeer Thanks. I have seen a lot of literature on sanitizing and cleaning draught systems. I can tell you firsthand that the faucets harbor some nasty stuff. When I first bought my (used) kegerator, the first thing I did was disassemble the faucet and replace the beverage lines. The internal parts of that faucet were disgusting! Let's just say I'm glad it's something that I didn't overlook. I knew the guy who had it previously (not a homebrewer) probably didn't pay attention to it much. 

 

The manual I linked to should be your guide.  The Brewer's Association has no agenda other than ensuring the brewing industry succeeds.  That should be your bible.  Whether you do everything to the extent they suggest or not, it's the ideal.

 

As I said, I was told by long time brewers that kegged that a certain faucet, specifically a Perlick with flow control, could not be disassembled, and had no need to be disassembled.  Wrong on both counts.  

 

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I've saved the manual on my phone and plan on checking it out when I get some time. I'm all about learning all I can. 

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12 hours ago, RickBeer said:

each faucet should be rinsed with clean water at the end of the day

ok @RickBeer you got me paranoid. just ran hot water through my faucets. i feel better now!

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Just now, Jdub said:

ok @RickBeer you got me paranoid. just ran hot water through my faucets. i feel better now!

Those things will get nasty if left unattended @Jdub

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Just now, Big Sarge said:

Those things will get nasty if left unattended @Jdub

well, i've only had my keezer up and running a couple of weeks, but I recognize it could get out of control quickly if i don't practice good habits. I have been drinking alot out of it though....lol

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7 minutes ago, Jdub said:

well, i've only had my keezer up and running a couple of weeks, but I recognize it could get out of control quickly if i don't practice good habits. I have been drinking alot out of it though....lol

I have no idea how long my one faucet was neglected, but I would take the time to remove and disassemble the first faucet that blows a keg. Seeing what I saw has me paranoid. I know that there's no telling how long it took to get like that, but I don't want to eat it either. At least you can get an idea about the inner workings and see if anything starts forming within a few weeks. I also think that commercial use of draught systems promotes less chance of infection than the common home kegerator use. 

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3 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

I have no idea how long my one faucet was neglected, but I would take the time to remove and disassemble the first faucet that blows a keg. Seeing what I saw has me paranoid. I know that there's no telling how long it took to get like that, but I don't want to eat it either. At least you can get an idea about the inner workings and see if anything starts forming within a few weeks. I also think that commercial use of draught systems promotes less chance of infection than the common home kegerator use. 

true. i started with brand new perlick faucets. will have to youtube how to take them apart. can't be that difficult to maintain them. i know that they pour great!

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7 minutes ago, Jdub said:

true. i started with brand new perlick faucets. will have to youtube how to take them apart. can't be that difficult to maintain them. i know that they pour great!

You're pretty fancy and high society with those perlick faucets lol. I have the standard government issue. I'd have to refer back to the draught manual @RickBeer linked earlier, but I believe they operate differently. 

Forgive me, I'm still learning. 

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53 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

You're pretty fancy and high society with those perlick faucets lol. I have the standard government issue. I'd have to refer back to the draught manual @RickBeer linked earlier, but I believe they operate differently. 

Forgive me, I'm still learning. 

yes, "Jdub in Texas" is extremely high society! i drink my shiner bock out of a diamond crusted crystal beer mug! LOL

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So my 3 gal corney keg came with some CO2 cartridges (16 gram) and a dispenser to hook up to the gas connector. Since I was hesitant to use it on something with beer, I decided to try it out in flushing my beer line/cobra tap during cleaning. It works, but it kinda smelled burnt when I purged to open the lid. Does anyone have any experience in using those little bottles/cartridges?

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So since I'm yet to get a manifold and provide multiple gas outlets, I have a little question since I'm about a week out from having two full kegs in the fridge. How much should I crank the second keg to, taking it off gas while I drink the other? I'd obviously dose up the CO2 intermittently, just to keep it working on carbing. I know this isn't an exact science type of question and could prove otherwise blasphemous. I would just like the second to carb up some while off gas so I can swap back and forth at some point. If I'm chasing my tail, just let me know. 

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28 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

So since I'm yet to get a manifold and provide multiple gas outlets, I have a little question since I'm about a week out from having two full kegs in the fridge. How much should I crank the second keg to, taking it off gas while I drink the other? I'd obviously dose up the CO2 intermittently, just to keep it working on carbing. I know this isn't an exact science type of question and could prove otherwise blasphemous. I would just like the second to carb up some while off gas so I can swap back and forth at some point. If I'm chasing my tail, just let me know. 

You could just tee the line. If you have the space for two kegs. 

otherwise, what i do is fill keg, purge a few times, then crank it up to 20 to set the seals. Then i store it away. It wont be fully carbed but youll be a day or two closer. 

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8 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

You could just tee the line. If you have the space for two kegs. 

otherwise, what i do is fill keg, purge a few times, then crank it up to 20 to set the seals. Then i store it away. It wont be fully carbed but youll be a day or two closer. 

Putting a tee in the line is definitely a great recommendation. How likely am I to find a tee barb at Ace/Lowe's/HD? 

If I cranked it to 20 on day 1, then popped another 20 in there 2-3 days later, do you think I'd be closer still? 

Hell, I just need to get a manifold lol

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7 hours ago, Big Sarge said:

Putting a tee in the line is definitely a great recommendation. How likely am I to find a tee barb at Ace/Lowe's/HD? 

If I cranked it to 20 on day 1, then popped another 20 in there 2-3 days later, do you think I'd be closer still? 

Hell, I just need to get a manifold lol

Extremely likely. Or at the LHBS too. I bought a plastic one years ago. One tee, 3 clamps, done and done

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2 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

Extremely likely. Or at the LHBS too. I bought a plastic one years ago. One tee, 3 clamps, done and done

I'm kinda restricted during the week, as my LHBS is an hour away. Thanks for the assist though!

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I ordered 40’ of beverage line. I switched one line from the 3’ to 10’ and left my psi at 10, let the line cool for a bit and guess what? I poured a perfect 🍺. I guess I was wrong and now I will be switching all my lines over. Thanks boys!

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14 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

I ordered 40’ of beverage line. I switched one line from the 3’ to 10’ and left my psi at 10, let the line cool for a bit and guess what? I poured a perfect 🍺. I guess I was wrong and now I will be switching all my lines over. Thanks boys!

Nice! It definitely beats purging gas to drop the pressure before serving, especially if you want to push it back up after drinking. 

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