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JerseyBrewer

Bottling and Conditioning

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I would call bottling the act of putting the beer into the bottles. Conditioning would be the time the beer spends in the bottles. Conditioning can either be done cold or at room temp depending on preference. Some people will refer to conditioning as lagering or aging. Whatever you call it, its all just time the beer spends in the bottle to reduce off flavors produced by fermentation.

I did forget to mention the carbonating phase which is the 1-2 weeks after you bottle that the beer will need to be kept at room temp to allow the yeast to eat the sugars and create the carbonation.

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When you bottle (adding the sugar or priming agent and then the beer from the Mr. Beer keg) you are first providing carbonation for your beer. This process could take anywhere from 1-2 weeks. Any time after the carbonation process has occurred is called conditioning since your are letting the yeast clear eat up all the stuff after the carbonation has happened. Conditioning just means that the longer you wait the better off your beer should be.

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ronnydobbs wrote:

When you bottle (adding the sugar or priming agent and then the beer from the Mr. Beer keg) you are first providing carbonation for your beer. This process could take anywhere from 1-2 weeks. Any time after the carbonation process has occurred is called conditioning since your are letting the yeast clear eat up all the stuff after the carbonation has happened. Conditioning just means that the longer you wait the better off your beer should be.

Good to know.

So the transition from 'carbonating' to 'conditioning' is not clearly defined. More or less they are two distinct technical terms to describe the chemical reactions occuring within the bottle prior to opening.

As a rule of thumb, the first two weeks are 'carbonating'.
any time after the first two weeks is 'conditioning'.

Thanks again!

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I was reading in another thread that the standard technique for good beer is 2/2/2.

The first 2 weeks = fermenting @ 70ish degrees
The middle 2 weeks = bottling @ 70ish degrees
The last 2 weeks = ????

What makes the last 2 weeks different from the middle two weeks? Temperature?

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yankeedag wrote:

Yes, the last 2 weeks in that is in the frige. It helps clarify the beer.


Okay. So, the last two weeks should be spent in a cold environment; fridge or my garage during the winter months.

This helps out a lot, thank you!

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yankeedag wrote:

Yes, the last 2 weeks in that is in the frige. It helps clarify the beer.

Can I be a little pushy and request a particular temperature range for conditioning?

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yankeedag wrote:

sure: 68~72*
Then prior to drinking, (for at few days at reglular frige temps)

Sorry yankeedag, I was not clear. I was looking for a particular temperature range for the conditioning stage (fridge).

From what I understand the average temperature for a fridge should be between 35 and 38 degrees F. I am pretty far north and my garage temperature is between 40 and 45 degrees F, do you think I can condition in my garage during the winter months?

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JerseyBrewer wrote:

yankeedag wrote:

sure: 68~72*
Then prior to drinking, (for at few days at reglular frige temps)

Sorry yankeedag, I was not clear. I was looking for a particular temperature range for the conditioning stage (fridge).

From what I understand the average temperature for a fridge should be between 35 and 38 degrees F. I am pretty far north and my garage temperature is between 40 and 45 degrees F, do you think I can condition in my garage during the winter months?

That would be ideal. Just be sure it doesn't freeze out there.

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