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Clearcut23

Had to pour out half my batch

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So today I traded my pontoon boat for another corny Keg and a CO2 cylinder with regulators. I decided to Keg my Mr.Beer High Country Canadian Draft. Before hand I cleaned out my keg with Oxy Clean Free. I rinsed it our 4 times with hot and cold water then I sanitized it using one step. As I was siphoning my beer into my keg I noticed a speck of Oxy clean left on the inside. So I stopped and grabbed a flashlight to investigate and discovered a whole shit load of Oxy Clean left in my Keg. I was pissed needless to say. After thinking about it I decided not to chance it and poured out almost half of my brew and re rinsed the damn keg 2 more times. Any how, whats left of my batch is force carbing right now and since I have never done this before I was wondering if anyone could tell me at what PSI should I pour my beer?

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The PSI depends on the temperature of your beer, they type of beer, the length of your beer line as well as your elevation above sea level.

Other than that, a good rule of thumb is a serving PSI of about 12.

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I would highly suggest you force carb for a week at the serving PSI of about 12. It's easy to over carb your beer by trying to carb it in a day.

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I dont really know what im doing yet so Ive been watching You Tube videos all week. Im force carbing this half batch in about a half an hour at 20psi just because there is so little of it, but next batch will be a week at 12 like you suggested. Thanks!

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Just poured at 12 psi. It was like white water rafting. way too high. I even vented the CO2 in my keg and then pressurized it to 12psi and after first pour I decided to go a little lower to around 5 just for starters.

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After I put my batch in the keg, I roll the keg as I put in 30psi. Then I let it sit for a day, then I do it again. When I put it in the keg'n'ater, chill, and then I release all the pressure and repressure to about 8 pounds (depending on the beer)

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I'm assuming you mean you are getting a lot of foam. This is not solely because your pressure is too high.

1) The 12 PSI may have been perfect but for how long were you forcing it at 20PSI? 20 PSI will overcarb your beer if set at that level too long. Even if you turn the pressure down and vent the keg you will not get instant results. It will take some time for the beer to get to the correct pressure. That's why I suggested the 12 PSI for a week and then drinking instead of trying to carb it it one day.

2) Temperature plays a HUGE role in the foam issue. Take a look at the following pic.

sanyo-kegerator.jpg

It's basically a mini fridge with a beer tower on top. The problem is that the beer tower is being cooled by the fridge since it shares the same air. Of course, hot air rises so that beer tower is going to be the WARMEST part of the setup. There is insulation in that tower but it is still going to be the warmest part of your setup. This is called "first pour foam" and is experienced by almost all kegerator owners. As a result, the beer that is in the beer line in the tower will get a few degrees warmer then the beer in the keg. When this happens the CO2 in that warmer beer comes out of solution and results in this foaming action. What people do to combat this problem is to pour that foam into a glass and then immediately have anotehr glass handy. The beer that comes out then will be perfect since it is actually cold since it coming straight from the keg now. The warm beer in the line is only about anough to fill a shot glass but when it foams it can fill an entire pint glass. Lowering the pressure MAY help after a day or two but that lower pressure will do you a disservice because in a few days you will have flat beer since there is not enough pressure being applied. Serving temperature should be about 38 degrees. You get the serving temperature by pouring a glass, then pour a second glass and take that reading. The beer in that glass is coming straight from the keg and gives you the correct reading.

In my case, if you have people over and people are constantly drawing pints every few minutes then the beer never has a chance to warm up and you always get perfect pours. If I let the keg sit for an extended period then you may get some foam due to temperature increase. FWIW, I have a blower setup which blows cold air from the bottom of the fridge up through a hose that goes right into my beer tower. This cools the tower to help maintain an even temperature level.

Another thing you can do is to pour into a pitcher. The pitcher will still get the initial foam but as you continue to pour the beer from the actual keg will start coming out and you'll get the beer you want. Then pour into a glass.

3) Moving the keg before pouring has a huge impact, especially if you have such a small amount of liquid in a larger keg. The liquid has more space to slosh around and get foamy. Have you ever tried to tap a keg soon after bringing it home? Instant foam from all the bumps and keg took coming home. That's why if you're having a party you should get the keg as soon as possible that day and ice it down. Then don't tap it until you are ready to serve.

4) Beer ling length. If the line that goes from your keg to your faucet is too short then you may have a problem with foam. Ideally the line should be about 5-6' long because that length will add more resistance in your line and forse the beer to come out more slowly.

5) When pouring be sure to open the handle all the way in one quick motion. Opening the handle slowly or halfway will lead to foam as well.

6) Your elevation above sea level is key too. The higher you are above sea level the more pressure you need to apply. I believe it's about one more PSI for every 2,000 feet above sea level. (Normal serving pressure is about 12 PSI)

It may take some time to get your settings right and you will probably be dumping lots of beer. Well, you may be dumping foam anyway. Even if you have a glass of foam it may only be about a shot glass size of beer so don't feel like you are losing that much.

Remember what I said though. It will take time for your pressure and temperature adjustments to take effect. You will NOT get instant results. Make gradual adjustments and then check your pour again a day later. If there are still problems then make another gradual adjustment and check it a day later.

My theory is that you are trying to pour your beer too warm.

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Thanks for all the help everybody. I drank a little too much West Coast pale ale last night to try my Keg beer (high country canadian draft) first thing this morning so I'll have to wait till the game starts. My batch was in the kegerator over night on 15psi because there is maybe a gallon or a little less than because of how much I had to dump out. I just took it out and shook it up, then vented out the pressure and re pressurized and shook it up again and put it back in the Mini fridge to keep cold for Kick off. Its a good thing I found and joined this board because if I had not I wouldnt know what to do. Thanks again!

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