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MarkMasus

chefs/cooks who brew

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I cook/bartend for a living and I find myself at the end of many days after 2 or 3 shift beers that I come up with some crazy ideas for brewing.

One I have thought of is creating a reduction using cocoa and molasses for a stout. reduce the mix, and pour it into the secondary fermenter and then add fermented wort to it for phase 2.

other reductions Ive thought of using would be a maraschino cherry reduction for use in a cherry wheat or stout with the aforementioned chocolate reduction.

The option are endless, I would personally take some of the wort from phase one, and keep it in the fridge until reduction time, add items to be reduced with saved wort and add to secondary fermenter.

I would be interesting to do a vanilla-citrus reduction for a wheat also.

anyone else kinda crazy like me?

:woohoo:

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From what I've learned over the last hundred and twenty some odd batches of beer is that I have an upper hand on brewing because, although not a chef, I am a GREAT home cook and have a feel for ingredients.

Do your thing Mark!!!!

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I absolutely love to cook at home- that's one reason I fell for this hobby so easily- anything's always better if you've played a part in selecting the ingredients, preparing and serving-- beer included. And I find myself getting the wheels turning more and more, thinking about upcoming brews, when I'm cooking or browsing at the various places I shop, always looking for some new angle. The reductions sound intriguing, Mark, please let us know if you try any. Great topic!

Steve

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I've made it no secret that I enjoy barbecuing. As hoovied said, it's one of the things that really got me hooked on brewing, and keeps me interested in it.

One thing I'm just coming to understand, though, is the vast differences between the crafts of cooking, baking, and brewing.

Savory cooking is where I'm strongest. I have a knack for taking whatever meat I'm working with, rummaging through the spice cabinet, and combining things to make a real nice entree. Eventually I write down the successful recipes so I can duplicate them

Baking is very exacting, and I don't do it. My wife's in charge of cookie-making around here, and I couldn't top her chocolate-chip-and-crack cookies anyway.

Brewing sort of combines savory cooking and baking, IMO. I find I can think up what kind of beer I'd like to have in the pipeline, and then figure out how to get there. But, as in baking, the ingredients need to be a little more exacting, and sussing out the recipe beforehand is essential. I added to my Brew Club order last night because it occurred to me I should start using hops, and I spent a good deal of time selecting what I felt was the best hops for what I intended.

The measurements also need to be more precise, because too little or too much of something can throw off the ABV, the flavor balance, the carb, etc.

So, to answer your original question, MarkMasus, we're probably all a little bit crazy like you! But that's a good thing.

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I love to cook, but never tried to cook with beer (except while I'm on the grill with a beer in hand...so I guess I'm cooking with beer)

I'm with Dave, I'm a HUGE BBQ fan. Got a smoker for my ribs, sausage, chicken etc. and I use it all the time (that and my grill) Its 10 degrees out and I'm grilling, I do it all year round. I make my own BBQ sauce and rubs...love it. Also I'm a huge mexican fan. BBQ and mexican is where its at!

I usually cook with peppers (jalapeno, habanero, pablano, hungarian peppers) anything with heat I love to cook with.

Man this is making me hungry!

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Cooking was just another bonus for my wife: she hates it, and I'll kick her out of the kitchen because it makes more room for me. I Love to cook. Even when we walk around the wally style stores, I've two places for Boy Toys... Power tools and the like along with the "Cooking" section. She just stands back, asks what I'd use "that" for, and I tell her, she just goes ... ok. sounds tasty. :stout:
So, yeah, we think of stuff. Others are just smoother with the words.

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MarkMasus wrote:

…One I have thought of is creating a reduction …

I would agree this may be the ultimate way to make your own extracts.

On the use of these reductions, I feel a need to point out that, if done in the secondary it will prolong the yeasties cleanup of by-products. Why not just add the reduction in primary? Some recommend adding fruit just after high Krausen to prevent overflow of the keg. What you will have is a reduction or a concentrate and adding it in at the beginning might be fine.

On a positive note: My mouth is watering thinking of the possibilities.

Chocolate – Almond
Cherry – Honey
Cherry – Vanilla
MMMMmmmmmm!!!!

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I'm with you Dave and beerfanfrombuffalo. Since I've moved to Texas 3 years ago, a couple of my co-workers introduced me to smoking meats and before I started homebrewing it was my favorite thing to do. Because of the crappy weather, I haven't incorporated the two but as the warmer weather nears and my pipeline is gushing I'm looking forward to having a homebrew in hand while watching a nice big brisket smoke. Me loving beer and BBQ will be taking on a whole new meaning!!

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nothing better than baby setting the smoker and drinking a lot of home brew, i love smoking ribs and brisket, there is alot of good bbq info an www.thesmokering.com there is tons of recipes and food porn.

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Crank the smoker up and pop the top on a cold home brew, now that's the way to spend an afternoon.

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FOOD PORN!

Think about that for a minute....


Food,sex,beer,chocolate...Damn!!!!

No wonder I'm an overweight horndog!

I cook/eat, brew/drink, *&%@, therefor I am alive!

Whale

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the reasoning for adding the reduction at 2ndary is because many microbrews do the same. I dont know much about the fermentation rate and the diff. between doing it at primary or at secondary.

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MarkMasus wrote:

the reasoning for adding the reduction at 2ndary is because many microbrews do the same. I dont know much about the fermentation rate and the diff. between doing it at primary or at secondary.

There would be a difference in flavor between adding in primary or secondary. Doing it in primary would give the yeast time to clean up some by-products of the reduction’s ferment. These by-products may or may not be desired.
To fine tune this brew, do a batch each way and compare. Just add say 1/3 cup at primary in one batch and 1/4 cup to secondary for the other batch.

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FedoraDave wrote:

I added to my Brew Club order last night because it occurred to me I should start using hops, and I spent a good deal of time selecting what I felt was the best hops for what I intended.

fedoraDave, man do I hear that ....................

Today, I tried DME and a hopsack for the first time. Did I make the best recipe? No. Did I start getting the feel and have fun? Yes.

These HME's really don't need tinkering. But I'm starting to realize if you get into other ingredients ... you can really "find your beer". It's going to take me a while.

I like your posts. You seem to appreciate what's going on in here, and make great contributions. I'll drink to that!

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tabasco, I began to realize that with the other stuff (fruit, honey, UMEs) that I wanted to put into recipes, I'd better get a handle on the hops situation. I don't want a beer that's unbalanced because I put too many flavors in it that will negate the aroma or bitterness of the hops. I'm not crazy about overly-hopped beers, preferring balanced, malty, or, if the occasion calls, fruity beers. But you need some bitterness in beer, or it's just wimpy-tasting. And aroma is very important, too, so in order to balance things out, I think adding hops will help me.

There are four components to beer; water, malt, hops, and yeast. Different recipes bring out different aspects of them, but I feel you need to be able to discern each ingredients contribution to some extent.

It's like barbecue sauce (getting back to another of my favorite topics!). Again, four components; salty, sour, spicy, and sweet. I find most commercial and restaurant sauces too sweet, to the point where they mask the sourness or the spiciness. I've come up with my own recipe (needless to say, I think it's the best sauce I've ever tasted), and it has a balance to it, with different aspects of each component coming through at different times. It doesn't taste spicy-hot, but it's got an afterburn I'm really proud of! And I'm learning and striving for that same type of effect in my beers. It's a learning process, but I've got nothing but time! :stout:

Nice to see there are other 'cuers here. I love smoking me some ribs, mostly because I can sit on my butt in the backyard, drink beer, and still say I'm busy! :laugh: :laugh:

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Ditto that. Definately strong on the savory. I will say, as was stated before, that being a good chef makes definately helps in the way of having a strong palate, which, I think is essential for brewing.

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PmdBama wrote:

Ditto that. Definately strong on the savory. I will say, as was stated before, that being a good chef makes definately helps in the way of having a strong palate, which, I think is essential for brewing.

No doubt it does. What I'm working on developing is a "brewer's palate" that will allow me to be more discerning of the ingredients of a beer and how they blend and work. I can do it for barbecue sauce pretty well, but I need some time and experience to really get good at it with beer.

Oh well, practice makes perfect! :gulp:

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I am an assistant pastry chef, my a pastry chef. We will be using that knowledge in my brewing. Nothing exotic yet, honeys & organics to brew with. Only the first batch was per Mr Beer guidelines :laugh:

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FedoraDave wrote:

No doubt it does. What I'm working on developing is a "brewer's palate" that will allow me to be more discerning of the ingredients of a beer and how they blend and work. I can do it for barbecue sauce pretty well, but I need some time and experience to really get good at it with beer.

Oh well, practice makes perfect! :gulp:

I set out last year to do the very same thing. A lot of my brews in the begining had real similar tastes though, and I really had to break out of the box to develop my palate.

I did it by getting really technical and brewing exact to style several times per style to really learn how the individual components work.

Now after 120 batches I still brew to style but it's MY version of that style the way I like it.

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