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Bigdawg01

RE: How do I brew with hops?

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Below are the directions for brewing with hops

When brewing with Hops, it's best to place them in a sanitized muslin hop sack to minimize hop particles in your finished beer. Tie off the open end of the sack, and place it in your boiling water just before removing the heat. Proceed as usual, leaving your hop sack in the fermenter for the entire Fermentation, unless your recipe directs you otherwise. Just throw it away after bottling your beer -- it's not reusable


But I notice in a lot of reviews that say they boiled there hops for ten minutes or more
My question is what the advantage to boiling them for five minutes or ten, or is it up to the recipe, does it add taste?

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Boiling hops adds bitterness to your beer.

The directions that Mr. Beer gives is a style of dry hopping which will not add any bitterness.

Best thing to do if you want to add hop flavor and aroma is to add dry hops into your fermenter after primary fermentation has died down. When primary fermentation is taking place, CO2 pushes out gas which in turn will release flavor and aroma out of the beer from your dry hops. So adding the hops after the fermentation has died down will keep in all the flavor and aroma.

Now if you want to add bitterness, you boil hops. To get bitterness, you typically boil the hops for 30-60 minutes. Any amount of boiling will add some bitterness. 15-20 minutes will add flavor and 5-10 minutes adds aroma.

Boil the hops in water mixed with unhopped malt (UME) or dry malt extract (DME)

Hope this helps.

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It's said that a 5-10 minute boil is used for Aroma only, 30 minute boil for taste and 60minutes for bittering, so it depends on your goal for the beer.

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Most of the Mr. Beer extracts already have hops in them. Others are just malt extracts, with no hops added. You can click on the links on Mr. Beer's homepage and see what's what.

If you want more bitterness or hops flavor in your Mr. Beer recipe, or if the recipe you're using calls for it, it's best to follow the directions you posted.

The posts you're reading in which it's mentioned that hops is boiled for ten minutes or half an hour or whatever, may be using unhopped extracts, and adding hops on their own.

The important thing to remember is that the Hopped Malt Extracts shouldn't be boiled. That's been done for you by Mr. Beer. If you're using any HME in your recipe, and want to add hops, you need to boil the hops with the Booster or any UME you're using, THEN add the HME after you've turned the heat off.

Hops is added to brews to give them bitterness, flavor, and/or aroma. How long you boil the hops depends on what influence you want. For bitterness, 30 minutes to an hour of boiling. For flavor, 20 to 30 minutes. For aroma, ten to 20 minutes. For all three, you need to add the hops at the appropriate times during the boil.

For instance, I did an all Dry Malt Extract brew recently. No hops at all in the extract. So I added some hops at the beginning of the boil; added some more after 20 minutes, then added more after fifteen minutes, and boiled it for another ten minutes. A total boil of about 50 minutes, but some of the hops boiled the whole 50 minutes, some only 25 or 30 minutes, and some ten. So I got bitterness, flavor, and aroma from my additions.

This sounds complicated, and it's my fault; I'm not explaining it very well, but it's really pretty simple. I hope someone with more experience and a better method of explaining it will condense and simplify what I've said.

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The most uncomplicated way to explain Hop Boil Time is like this:
Think of a NASA count down.
Certain things happen at T-Minus 60 (the boil has started, the count down begins) this is where the bittering part of the hop boil starts...add the hops for it.
T-Minus 20 ...this is where the flavoring aspect of boiling hops kicks in... not enough time left for this addition to add to the "bittering" but too long of a boil for the "aroma" to survive.
T-Minus 10... this is the "aroma" hop additon time. The hops won't be in long enough to add to the bittereing or the flavoring. It's just in there long enough to leave a lingering smell.
T-Minus 0... Flame out. Time to call it Wort and cool that puppy down and get it in the fermenter. :stout:

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Good way to put it yankeedag.

The times can very from batch to batch too. Like if your using bigger amounts of hops, you can cut down on the boil time. And less hops bump up the boil time to get bitterness and less flavor, etc, etc. That's what QBrew, Beersmith, online recipe calculators are good for.

Also, I've read (but never tried) that you can toss in hops at flameout. It's referred to as "knockout" hops. Supposed to add extra flavor and aroma to the wort without any additional bitterness. I will try it sometime. Sounds interesting.

And there is dry hopping which is simply tossing in some hops after fermentation and leaving them sit in the wort to add extra hoppy flavor and aroma. Some leave them in for a couple days up to a week or two.

The best part of brewing is it's all up to you. Experimenting is the best part IMO. Makes it more "yours" when you put your own touch into it. There really is no "wrong way" to do it. If you mess up, you could actually make something great or at worst just have some beer that doesn't taste that good but still gets you buzzed B)

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Note to self (and the Mr. B community.) I got lazy about a week and a half ago and decided not to use a hop sack when I dry hopped my IPA. I then paid the price when I bottled yesterday and the hop particles clogged up the tap to a stream the size of ant piss. The moral of the story...use a hop sack...ALWAYS. Brew on!

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Sammy wrote:

Note to self (and the Mr. B community.) I got lazy about a week and a half ago and decided not to use a hop sack when I dry hopped my IPA. I then paid the price when I bottled yesterday and the hop particles clogged up the tap to a stream the size of ant piss. The moral of the story...use a hop sack...ALWAYS. Brew on!

Must have used hop pellets I'm taking it.

I just dry hopped my last batch with a whole ounce of whole leaf cascade hops and didn't have one problem at all. The pellets turn into mushy gunk that I can see causing a problem at bottling time. I would use a hop sac for them for sure. For whole leaf I wouldn't even bother. I guess you could but they really don't leave any residue and they were floating on the top of the beer and just laid on top of the trub when the beer got to the bottom.

One thing I will say was it was a pain in the ass to clean the keg. Not only did I have all that trub at the bottom, I had TONS of hops to dump/scrape out. Those things got big when they rehydrated in the beer. An ounce of whole leaf hops it big when they're dry but when they soak up beer that ounce gets more than double the size haha. Well worth it for the flavor and aroma I'll get from it.

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Sammy wrote:

Note to self (and the Mr. B community.) I got lazy about a week and a half ago and decided not to use a hop sack when I dry hopped my IPA. I then paid the price when I bottled yesterday and the hop particles clogged up the tap to a stream the size of ant piss. The moral of the story...use a hop sack...ALWAYS. Brew on!

Same thing happened to me. :dry: I assume you were also using the bottling wand??

I've still got another brew in the keg yet to bottle that I dry hopped with no hop sack.
If this one gives me the dribbles (a.k.a. ant piss) I'll stop skipping the hop sack too.

Some guys use a metal tea-ball to plop their hops in the wort.
Might be worth a try. :huh:

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I figured it was the pellet hops that didn't need the sack. That's all I've used, never used a sack, never had a problem. Yet.

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Great...You guys got me worried now I dry hoped both of my last two batches that I am bottling this weekend and I used pellet hops.... I really don't want to have a clogged spout. Cold crashingf would solve this problem?

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Best little trick I've learned from this forum is to prop the keg up with a couple DVD boxes or magazines or something so the trub falls towards the back of the keg when fermenting. Also, I do this when I cold crash so it falls towards the back. The hop gunk from pellets when dry hopping should do the same.

Don't sweat it. Have a homebrew.

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What's a hop sack?

I've never used one, but I've never added more than 1/2 oz of hops to a batch (in addition to what was in the HME).

I always tilt the keg back during fermentation (stick something like a DVD case or a book under the front of it) then gently restore it to vertical before bottling. I've never had a problem with clogging.

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gophers6 wrote:

I figured it was the pellet hops that didn't need the sack. That's all I've used, never used a sack, never had a problem. Yet.

But do you use the bottling wand or just the regular spout?

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I am definitely learning as I go along. It was the pellet hops that I used to dry hop which broke down into a messy gunk. I now do the "prop-the-front-of-the-keg-up" trick, as well. Ah well, I still made beer and it will be delicious...or at the very least it will be beer, which is better than 99.782% of all things in this world.

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