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dpip75

First all grain!

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THIS IS NOT THE RECIPE ANYMORE.

I put this together yesterday using http://www.brewmasterswarehouse.com/brew-builder Any comments or critics would be appreciated. This will be my first all grain brew. Unfortunately the :evil: I mean wife, has my brewing on hold, so it may be awhile. :(:angry: Any who here is the recipe.

Aries 1978 (Amber Ale) batch size 4.8 gallons

OG 1.066
FG 1.020
IBU 40
SRM 12.53
ABV 6.03

Grains:
8 lb Briess 2 Row Brewers Malt
1 lb Caramel Vienne
12 oz Caramel Pils
12 oz Biscuit Malt
12 oz Briess 2 Row Caramel 40
12 oz Briess 2 Row Carapils
1 oz Crisp Pale Chocolate Malt

Hops and schedule:
Centennial .50 oz First Wort Hop
Centennial .25 oz 60 min
Centennial .25 oz 50 min
Centennial .25 oz 40 min
Centennial .25 oz 30 min
Centennial 1 oz 20 min
Centennial 1 oz 7 min
Centennial .25 oz 5 min
Centennial either 1 or 1/2 oz at flame out (need an opinion on this) :unsure:
Centennial 1 oz Dry Hop

Yeast: Wyeast Northwest Ale

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I'm not familiar with the Caramel Pils; I assumed it was carapils until I saw that you had that included later in your grain bill. I have found that a little bit of caramel/crystal malt can go a long way though, so my only suggestion would be to tone down the caramel/crystal malts a bit (unless you've already used them in these quantities and were happy with the results). My first mini-mash and all grain brews were heavy on those malts (around 20% of grain bill) with less than desirable results. Have fun, I'm doing all grain with all my five gallon batches now, it's a nice way to pass the time. :cheers:

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Thanks otg. I have never used caramel pils. i think it is carapils that has been roasted a bit. :unsure: I do want a toasty, caramel malt backbone with some nutty tones. Although this is the feedback I want. I have been reading all kinds of amber ale recipes. I guess I could nix the caramel pils and use more carapils or some honey malt. That will lighten it up a bit, but thats ok. I am about to do more research. :)

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I changed up the grains a little. Less caramel malts.

Grains:
8 lb Briess 2 Row Brewers Malt
1 lb Aromatic
1 lb 2 row carapils
12 oz Caravienne
12 oz crystal 40
10 oz biscuit
1 oz pale chocolate

Still up in the air, but I do like the grain bill here. :)

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I'm curious about how you came up with your grain amounts, i.e. 12 ounces of this, 10 ounces of that. Not in any way being critical, I am just wondering if there is a method to the madness. Going off a recipe? Just experimenting? I'm only 26 brews in, and with an infinite number of recipe permutations possible, I wonder if I'll ever experience half the possibilities.

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I am seeking advice and wanting opinions. I have never done this recipe or an all grain so I am listening to any criticism. I would love to brew even better beer than I do now so any advice is welcome. I really want a strong malty backbone and a very hoppy aroma/flavor from the centennial hops. I love Founders Centennial IPA. It may be my favorite beer of all time. I wanted to try an amber ale with similar but also different profiles. I am still a rookie, hell it took ten years of experimenting with different crust styles to finally get my pizza crust down perfectly. We learn something everyday.:)

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dpip75 wrote:

otg, I read many recipes and I use a brew builder. I am a chef so I come up with recipes the same as I do with food.... by the way, beer is food. :) I use http://www.brewsupplies.com/grain_profiles.htm as well. this sight has been very helpful. ;)

I like that site. Thanks for sharing. I always have had to search to see what needed to be mashed and what didn't. It's now a bookmark.

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Okay, overall the recipe looks okay, not really my kinda style, sorry; but I do have some questions.

I also wondered about the amounts; two questions; First, only 1 ounce of Pale Chocolate? Do you really think that will make significant contribution? If it were something really strong and distinctive, like roasted barley, I would agree; and I am not really disagreeing, just curious. And for what it's worth, my LHBS does not even have a 1 ounce counterweight for the scales. :D

And the more general comment...when I create recipes, I am often poaching 5 gal recipes, and scaling. Then, I normally round to the closest quarter pound, just to keep the measuring and math simple. Given the natural variation of efficiency, dilution, absorption, attenuation, etc., do you think the minor diffs would really matter?

David

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I have read recipes for fat tire clones where they only use 1 oz of pale chocolate. Does it make a difference? I don't know I think it does from past recipes using small amounts of chocolate (color and roasty flavor). I was thinking of cutting it out completely. I am still unsure though. As far as the amounts go I use the brew builder with my batch size set on 4.8 gallons (2 kegs). I was concerned about using Biscuit and aromatic but they are slightly different. Like I said, this is work in progress. I am not in any hurry at all. I want this to be really special. Thanks for the input Sirius :)

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I am about to re think this recipe. We are almost 24 hours into the harvested yeast fermenting in a honey water solution. I crossed 2 tbs of wyeast american ale 1056 with 2 tbs wyeast american ale II 1272. I wanted to start a unique strain and harvest this yeast cake for this recipe. I am really making a cross between an IPA and an amber ale. The hoppy flavors and aromas of a good IPA (Founders Centennial IPA) but the malt backbone and color of an amber ale. I have some thinking to do. Any pointers on the yeast project?

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Hey dpip... I was wondering... what style of mash will you be doing this recipe in? Ive been considering getting into all-grain, but I think I need a few more batchs of extract under my belt. Are you doing single, temp-controlled, or decoction mashing? I'm following this thread closely. Concerning the yeast project, Papazian actually suggests mixing yeast as a form of experimentation, and alludes to development of unique strain qualities by doing this and by using multiple generation propogated yeast, but is abit vague about it. Something about the characteristics shifting based on consistantly supplied environment and such... Sounds like fun.

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I am doing a single infusion mash. Yeah I have more yeast than I can use right now. I hope I can keep it alive for a while. I think I have my recipe together. Here goes.

Aries 1978 (amber ale) batch size 5 gal.

OG 1.066
FG 1.017
IBU 39.4
ABV 6.42

Grains:
10 lb 2 row brewers malt
1 lb Aromatic
.5 lb 2 row caramel 60
.5 lb Caramel vienne
.25 lb 2 row carapils

Hops:
Centennial .50 oz @ FWH
Centennial .25 oz @ 60 min
Centennial .25 oz @ 50 min
Centennial .25 oz @ 40 min
Centennial .25 oz @ 30 min
Centennial 1 oz @ 20 min
Centennial 1.25 oz @ 7 min
Centennial .25 oz @ 0 min
Centennial 1 oz Dry hop (7 days)

Wyeast 1056/1272 hybrid calling it American Ale III 2328

OK, let me have it guys. :)drunk_dude_with_drunk_old_ladies.jpg

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Just one comment:

Any pointers on the yeast project?

I'd definitely recommend using LME or DME or some other malt as a base for your starters. There are a lot of nutrients in malt that just aren't found in honey alone, plus the variety of simple & complex carbohydrates found in malt (as opposed to honey) is a little better for your yeasties while they're in the growth phase.

All-malt starters with a bit of yeast nutrient is even better!

:cheers:

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ericg wrote:

Just one comment:

Any pointers on the yeast project?

I'd definitely recommend using LME or DME or some other malt as a base for your starters. There are a lot of nutrients in malt that just aren't found in honey alone, plus the variety of simple & complex carbohydrates found in malt (as opposed to honey) is a little better for your yeasties while they're in the growth phase.

All-malt starters with a bit of yeast nutrient is even better!

:cheers:

Thanks Eric! I figured that. I basically just wanted to see if I could wake up The yeast that I harvested. I am going to get some DME when I get ready to start up some more yeast. I have a couple questions. First, how long can I keep harvested yeast in the fridge? Second can I harvest the yeast from the honey water ferment? I can't brew for a few weeks. :unsure: Thanks again. :cheers:

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