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Jakeyankee

Virgin Brewer

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Haven't sipped it yet. It is in the keg - my first batch of beer - Canadian Lager. Should I filter it when bottling? The batch has been in the keg for 1 week and I plan to bottle next Saturday. This would give me 2 weeks for Carbonation and 2 more weeks for Conditioning. Should be ready for 4th of July.
I need some feedback from you Long Time Brewers. Should I buy the accessories? What would you do at this stage?

I am already looking forward to my next batch - a good Stout or Porter.

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Definitely do NOT try and filter when bottling. The big breweries do that under very controlled and expensive oxygen free environments. The biggest bottling no no you can commit (other than dirty equipment), is oxygenating the beer. I mentioned on another thread that I don't think aerating before fermenting temps are reached is a huge deal, but aerating after fermenting IS, according to every source I've read. I take their word for it.
Welcome aboard, and remember the credo: Relax, don't worry, and have a homebrew. :party:

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I agree with otg. There really isn't any need to filter. That being said, when you do drink it, you're going to want to pour it. After you bottle it, you're still going to get some trub on the bottom of the bottle. Just bottle according to MB instructions and you'll be fine. If you have the equipment you can batch prime (just do a search here), but otherewise, like the man said.....Relax, Don't Worry, Have a Homebrew.

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ya from my short time brewing, ive learned filtering is a no no at this stage in your brewing career.

If your careful and dont move your keg, you should be able to make some pretty clear beer anyhow, but youll still be left with some trub. Its live beer, and live beer tastes so much better then twice filtered, adjunct filled swill from the store.

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I'd recommend getting a hydrometer.

If/when you want to feel like you want to move up to adding extra hops, DME or grains, a small digital kitchen scale comes in very handy.

If you're thinking stout don't hesitate to go after both the St Patrick's and the Oatmeal Stout. They're both excellent on their own and provide a great base if you want to tweak them a bit so suit your own tastes.

Welcome and congratulations on your new hobby/obsession.

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Don't try to filter it. You would need 2 corny kegs, a c02 tank, and the filter. To bottle your filtered beer, you would also need a beer gun filler to add your carbonated beer to bottles.

It doesn't sound too hard to do, just need a lot of equipment.

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Never a need to filter homebrew. Just let it condition in the bottle, and when you pour it, don't 'glug' the bottle. Pour in a slow, smooth motion, and watch it toward the end. When you see the sediment moving toward the glass, end the pour, and drink the rest. The clarity of the beer is really just cosmetic. If I have to bring my beers somewhere to share, I just try to not shake them up. If you are not pouring into a clear glass, you can just roll the bottle on its side once or twice, and pour like it is a commercial beer. The small amount of sediment on a proper homebrew is very small - pretty much as thick as a layer of paint.

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Starderup wrote:

...and when you pour it, don't 'glug' the bottle. Pour in a slow, smooth motion, and watch it toward the end. When you see the sediment moving toward the glass, end the pour,
and drink the rest.
The clarity of the beer is really just cosmetic...

I wouldn't recommend that. Although it won't kill ya or anything, it can be unpleasant to a degree. That live yeast and such that gathers at the bottom is best left at the bottom when you pour, Your guts will thanks you.

why does my homebrew make me fart?

Your family will thank you!

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When I pour, I leave an inch in the bottom of the bottle so as not to get off flavor from the trub into the clear beer. When I'm done drinking the clear beer I pour the last inch into the glass and drink it. I realize some people don't like the taste of that last inch so if I have company I pour it into my glass.

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Socalf1fan wrote:

but youll still be left with some trub. Its live beer, and live beer tastes so much better then twice filtered, adjunct filled swill from the store.

Amen, and hallelujah!!!!!

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Let's see, we carbonate our homebrew in a storage vessel using yeast and some form of sugar, we seal this storage vessel, the yeast consumes all of the sugar and goes dormant. We then, at some later date, chill the beer and force the major portion of the yeast(dead or dormant) to settle, we then transfer the beer to a drinking vessel leaving the settled portions of the yeast in the storage container. If we have performed all of these processes properly there is very little or no brewing yeast left in the beer that we consume. Is this lack of yeast necessary for it to be good beer, yes and no. Yes in the fact that most people in the U.S. don't associate a yeasty taste with their beer, no in the fact that it is generally not harmful to humans. I find it humorous that so many people do not realize the way that live yeast can affect their digestive system. Too much living in a sterile world. TRUB will not kill you and you can't make beer without it. Don't fret the trub, just enjoy the beer.

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Zobl wrote:

Starderup wrote:

...and when you pour it, don't 'glug' the bottle. Pour in a slow, smooth motion, and watch it toward the end. When you see the sediment moving toward the glass, end the pour,
and drink the rest.

I wouldn't recommend that. Although it won't kill ya or anything, it can be unpleasant to a degree. That live yeast and such that gathers at the bottom is best left at the bottom when you pour, Your guts will thanks you.

why does my homebrew make me fart?

Your family will thank you!

I nearly always take that last swig from the bottle. If the family can't deal with it, well... I'd say that that is their problem. Maybe they should just buy some air freshener or something... ;)

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Hey, don't get me wrong. I like to rip a good one as much as the next guy. :blink: :S :dry: :P
Just figured people should know what they're getting themselves in to when they discover their homebrew is good to the last drop! :laugh:

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