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tcsinowski

Stout Recipe

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What is your best Stout recipe? Any suggestions on which Stout I should make? This will be my 4th beer so I think I am getting the hang of things but still have a lot to learn. Thanks for the help!

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Tcsinowski

This recipe is getting me alot of great reviews. The one piece of advice I am getting is let it condition for a few more months

I made it when my buddie Jon (aka crazy Uncle Jon (aka Cuj)) came over one day.

Recipe Darth Cuj - Dark Side Stout
Style Foreign Extra Stout
Brewer Scott Bennett
Batch 2.16 gal


1.061 OG
1.015 FG

Recipe Bitterness 89 IBU
Alcohol by Volume 5.9%
Recipe Color 38° SRM

Ingredients
1.00 lb Dark DME
1.21 lb MrB. Creamy Brown UME
1.21 lb MrB. St. Patrick's Irish Stout

Quantity
1.00 oz Magnum Pellet 0 minutes
1.00 oz Magnum Pellet 30 minutes
1.00 oz MrB. St. Patrick's Irish Stout 5 minutes

6.00 unit Lager yeast Yeast

Final_Darth_Cuj_small-20100611.png

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114g Dark Crystal
57 g Roasted Barley
2 qt. water, steep at 160* intial temp, for 30 min.
remove grains, rinse grains ith 1 quart of water.
220g Golden brown sugar
bring to boil. remove from flame.
add:
1 can Irish Stout HME
1 can creamy brown UME
mix well, cool
yeast:
1 pk of MB yeast, in 1/2 cup water. add 1/2 tsp yeast energizer start this while steeping grains. Add 1 tsp of grain wort to water for the yeast. :stout:

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Darkly's American Ebony Stout
-----------------------------
Brewer: Darkly Microbrew
Style: American Stout
Batch: 2.50 galExtract

Characteristics
---------------
Recipe Gravity: 1.055 OG
Recipe Bitterness: 31 IBU
Recipe Color: 50° SRM
Estimated FG: 1.009
Alcohol by Volume: 5.9%
Alcohol by Weight:4.7%

Ingredients
-----------
Chocolate Malt (US) 0.57 lb, Grain, Steeped
MrB. Creamy Brown UME 1.18 lb, Extract, Extract
MrB. St. Patrick's Irish Stout1.18 lb, Extract, Extract
Muntons DME - Dark 1.00 lb, Extract, Extract

Cascade 0.50 oz, Pellet, 5 minutes
MrB. St. Patrick's Irish Stout 1.00 oz, Pellet, 5 minutes

Just finished carbing phase and started conditioning phase...
Tastes totally amazing, though its not a stout for you hopheads, which I'm not..lmao

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Those all sound good and any would be worth brewing. Great label to go with StarRaptor's stout, the label was more complex that the brew.

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I've enjoyed this one...

Soured Stout
--------------------------------
Brewer: Swenocha
Style: Oatmeal Stout
Batch: 2.13 galExtract

Characteristics
---------------
Recipe Gravity: 1.057 OG
Recipe Bitterness: 38 IBU
Recipe Color: 41° SRM
Estimated FG: 1.014
Alcohol by Volume: 5.5%
Alcohol by Weight: 4.3%

Ingredients
-----------
MrB. St. Patrick's Irish Stout1.21 lb, Extract, Extract
MrB. Creamy Brown UME 1.21 lb, Extract, Extract
Briess DME - Traditional Dark 0.50 lb, Extract, Extract
Chocolate Malt (US) 0.03 lb, Grain, Steeped
Black Patent (US) 0.03 lb, Grain, Steeped
Crystal 10L 0.03 lb, Grain, Steeped
Roasted Barley 0.03 lb, Grain, Steeped

Brown Sugar, Light 0.22 lb, Sugar, Other

Fuggles (U.K.) 0.50 oz, Pellet, 20 minutes
MrB. St. Patrick's Irish Stout1.00 oz, Pellet, 5 minutes

Lager yeast 2.00 unit, Yeast,
Soured Guinness Extra Stout 1.00 unit, Other, 4 guinness extra stouts soured for 2.5 weeks

Notes
-----
Recipe Notes:
- toasted oats at 300 until begin to brown
- steep grains and oats for 30 min at 155
- bring to boil after removing grains and oats
- drop hops; boil 20 min
- add soured stout at 10 min
- remove from heat, follow Mr. B instructions

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Guest System Admin

I really liked the St. Patrick's Irish Stout recipe from the MB website. I brewed it back in March 2010 and drank it all, it was pretty close to a Guiness Stout in taste although the Guiness is a bit 'thinner'.

I liked it so much that I just brewed up my second batch last weekend.

The Screwy Brewer

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My Dark Star (Imperial Chocolate Stout) is a hit with all my beer friends. I have an extract and an all grain recipe for this brew. I add lightly crushed Cameron's chocolate caramel brownie coffee in a sack to the boil for the last 10 minutes. I have only done the extract version and I am planning to do the all grain in a week or so. This is a great sight. I have a 10% discount code if anyone wants to order with these guys. They are in Georgia and charge 6.99 for shipping. Here are both links. :)
http://www.brewmasterswarehouse.com/brew-builder
http://www.brewmasterswarehouse.com/brew-builder

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tcsinowski wrote:

What is your best Stout recipe? Any suggestions on which Stout I should make? This will be my 4th beer so I think I am getting the hang of things but still have a lot to learn. Thanks for the help!

what did you end up going with

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One of my favorite's of all time is the Shillelagh Stout. I subbed brown sugar for the booster and steeped a little chocolate and dextrine malt. I will be doing it again once I get a keg opened up.

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I had to take a break from brewing as i got married, but i just got got my new order in. I got the russian imperial stout mr beer kit and added some chocolate DME and a carmel coffee bean instead of the espresso beans.

RECIPE INCLUDES:
1 Can St. Patrick's Irish Stout HME
1 Can Creamy Brown UME
1 Pouch Booster™
1 Packet Dry Brewing Yeast (under lid of HME)
1 Packet Willamette Pellet Hops
1 Packet Palisade Pellet Hops
2 Muslin Hop Sacks
1 Packet One-Step™ Sanitizing Cleanser

YOU PR0VIDE:
1/2 Cup Brown Sugar
1 Cup Espresso Beans (coarsely crushed)

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Sorry i forgot to say that i dropped the booster and changed to a full cup of brown sugar.

Also changed the yeast to a Lager Yeast.

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Congrats on the wedding!

Are you adding the DME to the recipe or replacing the Creamy Brown UME or the booster?

I just used some crushed caramel chocolate brownie coffee beans in my imperial stout that I made last week. I put it in a hop sack and added it for the last 10 minutes of my boil. It smelled awesome!

Keep the borg posted with your results!

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tcsinowski wrote:

Sorry i forgot to say that i dropped the booster and changed to a full cup of brown sugar.

Also changed the yeast to a Lager Yeast.

You answered before I even asked. :) Good choice on the brown sugar. I think you'll like that.

What made you decide on the Lager Yeast? Which one are you using?

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Im not sure which one Im gonna get yet. I should be stopping by the store Friday and brew on Saturday.

I will be adding the DME to the recipe, And replacing the Booster for extra brown sugar.

I haven't completely decided on which coffee beans I am going to use yet. The caramel chocolate brownie coffee beans, sounds amazing. Ill check the store and see what they have.

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tcsinowski wrote:

I haven't completely decided on which coffee beans I am going to use yet. The caramel chocolate brownie coffee beans, sounds amazing. Ill check the store and see what they have.

Cameron's was the brand. It was in the specialty coffee section that you pour yourself. It was good because I only bought an ounce (what I was going to use).

I would suggest using an Irish Ale Yeast for this one. Although, if you decide to ferment it as a lager, I would be interested to hear how it turns out! As James Spencer would say, it's always good to "play with your beer." :stout:

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tcsinowski wrote:

How fine did you crush/grind the coffee beans?

Double bagged them in ziplock bags and used the bottom of my measuring cup to beat the hell out of them. That did the trick!

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Awesome, now I just need to pick up the additions on my way home from work and brew in the morning.

thanks for all of your help and suggestions/opinions!

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tcsinowski wrote:

Awesome, now I just need to pick up the additions on my way home from work and brew in the morning.

thanks for all of your help and suggestions/opinions!

Good luck and let us know how the brewing goes!

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Here is the final recipe:

1 Can St. Patrick's Irish Stout HME
1 Can Creamy Brown UME
1 lb Dark DME
1 lb chocolate steeping grain
.5 oz Willamette Pellet Hops
.5 oz Palisade Pellet Hops
2 Muslin Hop Sacks
1 Cup light Brown Sugar
1 Cup caramel toffee Coffee Beans (crushed)
1 container WLP004 Irish Ale Yeast

Notes:
Steeped grains for 45 mins at 155*
Added coffee and hops last 10 mins.
brewed up very dark and dense.
heavy coffee flavor during brewing.
removed coffee beans and left hops in fermenter

Now we play the waiting game.

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Did you steep for 45, and then boil for 10 minutes with the hops? Or did you add the hops to the steep (and not to a boil)? Just curious...

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I just re-read what I wrote and realized I wasn't clear at all.

Steeped for 45.

And then added dme, brought to boil, added coffee and hops for around 10 mins.

Sorry for the mixup

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Just bottled the beer, it has a very strong coffee taste and very dark. Now we play the waiting game.

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Brew City wrote:

tcsinowski wrote:

How fine did you crush/grind the coffee beans?

Double bagged them in ziplock bags and used the bottom of my measuring cup to beat the hell out of them. That did the trick!


I made a coffee mocha stout and added 1.5 ounces of brewed espresso and a 1/2 teaspoon of mocha powder to each 1 litre bottle....it was awesome.

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Screwy Brewer wrote:

Brew City wrote:

tcsinowski wrote:

How fine did you crush/grind the coffee beans?

Double bagged them in ziplock bags and used the bottom of my measuring cup to beat the hell out of them. That did the trick!


I made a coffee mocha stout and added 1.5 ounces of brewed espresso and a 1/2 teaspoon of mocha powder to each 1 litre bottle....it was awesome.

Was that 12 oz. or 1 L bottles?

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While we're on the subject of stouts...has anyone tried the Coopers Irish Stout? I bought one on clearance at my LHBS for $15. I'm going to use the whole can in my Mr. Beer keg.

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Zobl wrote:

Screwy Brewer wrote:

Brew City wrote:

tcsinowski wrote:

How fine did you crush/grind the coffee beans?

Double bagged them in ziplock bags and used the bottom of my measuring cup to beat the hell out of them. That did the trick!


I made a coffee mocha stout and added 1.5 ounces of brewed espresso and a 1/2 teaspoon of mocha powder to each 1 litre bottle....it was awesome.

Was that 12 oz. or 1 L bottles?


It was per 1 liter bottle....of course you want to let the espresso cool down to 70F or so before pouring into the bottles.

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My stout has been bottled for 3 weeks. I'm considering placing a small bottle in the fridge and tasting it this weekend. Any thoughts?

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Guest

Me thinks the taste will not be what u expected this young. I'd (IMHO) give it another couple weeks atleast, but it's your brew, go for it. Let us know how it taste.

:silly:

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I just tasted one of my stouts last night, 47 days in the bottle, very disappointed, scheduling the next test for two months from now.

YMMV

David

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Still very young. Heavy coffee taste and aroma. Very thick body. This is by far the best beer I have made. Can't wait to have some more!! 1287531887385.jpg1287531978436.jpg

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Brewing beer using DME allows a brewer to put their mark on the beers they brew since the bags are clearly marked with which types and percentages of grains were used to make it. Using DME also makes your recipe's hop selection and schedule easier to figure out since DME has no hops already added to it. This allows your to be more creative in selecting the type of hops and boil times needed to get the right flavors, aroma and bitterness into your beer.

The addition of the freshest specialty grains to the recipe's base malt provides the color, flavors and caramelized sugars that add the depth and complexity needed to produce a superior beer. The English Ale yeast was selected for its ability to form a compact sedimentation that produces a beer with improved clarity and the use of traditional English hops add the authentic Stout taste.

Recipe:
Size 2.13 gallons: Estimated IBU=28, SRM=35, OG=1.049, FG=1.012, ABV=4.7%

1/8 pound Black Patent
1/8 pound Carapils
1/8 pound Chocolate Malt
1/8 pound Crystal 60L
1/8 pound Roasted Barley
2 pounds Muntons DME - Dark

1 ounce Kent Goldings (UK) pellet hops boiled for 30 minutes

11.5 grams Fermentis Safale S-04 yeast
Pitched at 65F and fermented at 65F

Directions:
Steep grains at 155F for 30 minutes in 2 quarts filtered water
Boil hops in wort for 30 minutes
Boil DME in wort for 10 minutes
Place in ice bath until wort temperature cools to 68F
Add 6 quarts cold filtered water to Mr. Beer fermenter
Pour cooled wort into fermenter keg and pitch yeast
Ferment at constant 65F temperature for 21 days

Click here for more...Screwy's Irish Stout

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I finally got around to drinking a litre of this Stout on Sunday and it tasted excellent. It was dark and clean with great head retention and I'm sure it will be even better after it's had more time to condition and mellow out.


stoutsampl.jpg
Dry Stout Bottling Sample With Residual Co2

I primed each bottle individually with pure cane sugar and used the Mr. Beer bottling wand to bottom fill each 1 litre bottle.

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SiriusDG wrote:

I just tasted one of my stouts last night, 47 days in the bottle, very disappointed, scheduling the next test for two months from now.

YMMV

David

I hear you on that one. Although I messed up my Imperial with calculating hops out due to the late addition of malt at flameout, my IBUs shot through the roof to up over 100 IBUs..... BUT..... after 2 months in the bottle the taste started coming around and now 4 months into the bottle I have another one in the fridge to test it out. It sucked after 20 days, better after 40 days, and i'm hoping the hops mellowed out fully now and it will be awesome. Stouts definately need the extra time in the bottle to be at their peak. 4-6 months is probably optimal.

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Well, sadly, the cream stout is almost assuredly toast...not sure, still evaluating what the cause is.

I tapped the Russian Imperial last weekend...45 days in the bottle...OMG, is this good!! And I know it will be better with age, but I just happen to have 4 bottles in the cooler behind me for a dinner party I am going to straight from work...I hope at least two of them actually make it there!! :laugh: :woohoo: :laugh: :woohoo: B)

David

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D Rabbit wrote:

SiriusDG wrote:

I just tasted one of my stouts last night, 47 days in the bottle, very disappointed, scheduling the next test for two months from now.

YMMV

David

I hear you on that one. Although I messed up my Imperial with calculating hops out due to the late addition of malt at flameout, my IBUs shot through the roof to up over 100 IBUs..... BUT..... after 2 months in the bottle the taste started coming around and now 4 months into the bottle I have another one in the fridge to test it out. It sucked after 20 days, better after 40 days, and i'm hoping the hops mellowed out fully now and it will be awesome. Stouts definately need the extra time in the bottle to be at their peak. 4-6 months is probably optimal.

D Rabbit, How did you overestimate your hops by so much, do you use any recipe designing software?

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Screwy Brewer wrote:

D Rabbit wrote:

SiriusDG wrote:

I just tasted one of my stouts last night, 47 days in the bottle, very disappointed, scheduling the next test for two months from now.

YMMV

David

I hear you on that one. Although I messed up my Imperial with calculating hops out due to the late addition of malt at flameout, my IBUs shot through the roof to up over 100 IBUs..... BUT..... after 2 months in the bottle the taste started coming around and now 4 months into the bottle I have another one in the fridge to test it out. It sucked after 20 days, better after 40 days, and i'm hoping the hops mellowed out fully now and it will be awesome. Stouts definately need the extra time in the bottle to be at their peak. 4-6 months is probably optimal.

D Rabbit, How did you overestimate your hops by so much, do you use any recipe designing software?

Yea, I was using beersmith when I made the recipe and I was fairly new to using it at the time. I forgot to adjust the recipe for the late addition of the LME, therefore bypassing the boiling of it and making the beer more hoppy than malty.

If I had it in there correctly, meaning the DME for the 50 minute boil and the LME for the flame out addition, the hops would have had to be scaled back quite a bit. Instead when I made the recipe i put it in to read that the LME and DME were being boiled for the full 50 minutes, which would have given me IBUs in the mid 80s range. Instead I added the LME at flameout and when I corrected the recipe in Beersmith it rocketed my IBUs to 140ish.

The good news about that is it is a very strong beer with a lot of malt backbone and you can't really taste a lot of the hops for the bitterness due to that (not to mention anything over 100 is usually just a waste of IBUs). The other good news is that about 60 of the IBUs are bitterness and everything else is flavor and aroma so it doesn't really smack you wiht the full bitterness potential. Somehow it turned out really good still!

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D Rabbit wrote:

Screwy Brewer wrote:

D Rabbit wrote:

SiriusDG wrote:

I just tasted one of my stouts last night, 47 days in the bottle, very disappointed, scheduling the next test for two months from now.

YMMV

David

I hear you on that one. Although I messed up my Imperial with calculating hops out due to the late addition of malt at flameout, my IBUs shot through the roof to up over 100 IBUs..... BUT..... after 2 months in the bottle the taste started coming around and now 4 months into the bottle I have another one in the fridge to test it out. It sucked after 20 days, better after 40 days, and i'm hoping the hops mellowed out fully now and it will be awesome. Stouts definately need the extra time in the bottle to be at their peak. 4-6 months is probably optimal.

D Rabbit, How did you overestimate your hops by so much, do you use any recipe designing software?

Yea, I was using beersmith when I made the recipe and I was fairly new to using it at the time. I forgot to adjust the recipe for the late addition of the LME, therefore bypassing the boiling of it and making the beer more hoppy than malty.

If I had it in there correctly, meaning the DME for the 50 minute boil and the LME for the flame out addition, the hops would have had to be scaled back quite a bit. Instead when I made the recipe i put it in to read that the LME and DME were being boiled for the full 50 minutes, which would have given me IBUs in the mid 80s range. Instead I added the LME at flameout and when I corrected the recipe in Beersmith it rocketed my IBUs to 140ish.

The good news about that is it is a very strong beer with a lot of malt backbone and you can't really taste a lot of the hops for the bitterness due to that (not to mention anything over 100 is usually just a waste of IBUs). The other good news is that about 60 of the IBUs are bitterness and everything else is flavor and aroma so it doesn't really smack you wiht the full bitterness potential. Somehow it turned out really good still!


Good to hear it still came out right for you.. I haven't used anything other than qBrew and was wondering how you came up with the IBU count, thank you for sharing.

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