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Zobl

CHARTS / GRAPHS

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Hey all,
I thought I'd start a thread that would be a one-stop shop for all those useful charts and graphs that get posted on the forum from time to time.
If you're like me, when you remember seeing something a while back, you don't remember what thread it was in or who posted it and it is tough to find it again in a pinch.
This way if you need a chart or graph, it might just be right here.
Then in the future, do a search for this thread named CHARTS/GRAPHS.

Good luck,
Z
:)

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Here's a chart that explains the balance between hops and malt and it's relationship to gravity:

hopsgraph.jpg

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actually, this would be good information in that other section for Newbz to read. Next thing you know, we'll have a seperate section that says: "Read this before you try to move up, or your beer will taste like BMC." (I didn't want to say "will suck")

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Here's a Periodic Chart of Beer Styles.
Very cool.
Tells you the SRM color value, IBU's and Balance Value of every style of beer!

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Link to a great page that has calculators for:
:) Hydrometer Gravity Corrector
:) Fermentation Calculator
:) Yeast Pitching Rate Calculator
:) Infusion Mash Calculator


BrewCalcs.com

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This thread has the potential to become a classic.

Can't believe I missed this thread when it was first posted!

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This is a really great thread, 'so much information so little time'!

Here's an article about making your own invert sugar

Make your own invert sugar

Belgian brewers often use sugar in beer making to produce high alcohol beers without a thick body. They normally will use what is called Candi Sugar, but this stuff is pretty expensive, costing homebrewers around $4-5 per pound. Basically, candi sugar is ordinary white cane/beet sugar (sucrose) that has been modified by an 'inversion' process, producing 'invert sugar'.

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College students drink 430 million gallons of beer a year? I don't think I drank more than about 100 million gallons in all 4 years.

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ztanner25 wrote:

why has this not been posted earlier


Which part?

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Click HERE for another very good chart on the characteristics, uses and substitutions for hops. It is specific to different beer styles via a drop down menu at the top. Really nice.

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Winter Beer Styles – Beers to Brew in Fall, Drink in Winter: :freeze:
Holiday Ales
Christmas/Winter Beer
Stouts, Porters and other Dark Beers
Barley Wine (needs long aging – start a year or more in advance)
Winter Wheats
Smoked Rauchbier
Scotch Ale
Old Ale

Spring Beer Styles – Beers to Brew in Winter, Drink in Spring :drinking:
Irish Ale and Irish Stout
Green Beer for St Patty’s Day
Bock/Doppelbock
India Pale Ale
Fruit Beer
Wheat Beer, Weizen and Weisse – particularly Hefeweizen
Saison
Blonde Ale
Belgian Wit/White Beer

Summer Beer Styles – Beers to Brew in Spring, Drink in Summer :sweat:
Bavarian Weizen/Weisse
Pilsner
Cream Ale
Steam Beer – California Common
Kolsch Beer
Summer Ales
Saison
Fruit/Wheat Beers

Fall Beer Styles – Beers to Brew in Summer, Drink in the Fall :chug:
Marzen/Oktoberfest
Pumpkin Beer
English Pale Ale
Brown Ales
Dunkelweizen
Harvest Ale

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Man... I've been drinking my beers all out of season... Maybe that's why I'm feeling so off-kilter... ;)

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HooAhBrew wrote:

I stumbled across THIS handy page...who knew calculus was really this interesting B)

Who ever found calculus anything BUT interesting? I'll give passes to those who found it fascinating, enthtralling, etc.

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You could TOTALLY be the life of the party with that pocket guide! (Ok...pony up...who among the Borg already has theirs)...?

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Here's one not everyone has seen. This also appears in Charlie Papazian's The Homebrewer's Companion. 10_10_001-20110217.jpg

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Hmm, it's interesting that it varies slightly from this graph:

hop_utilization.jpg


Close enough for me though. I do feel though that your graph more accurately represents dry hopping for aroma while this one indicates you'd want a 7 min boil time for max aroma.

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The most dramatic difference between the two seems to be the amount of time needed for maximum flavor. The first one puts max flavor at around 13 or 14 min, and the second one puts it 20 or 21 min. That's a pretty big swing.

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Zobl wrote:

True dat... Let me guess... you made to happy hour a little early, right?
:drinking:

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swenocha wrote:

Zobl wrote:

True dat... Let me guess... you made to happy hour a little early, right?
:drinking:

You beat me to my edit! B)

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Had to steal this tid-bit and put it here for future reference...

D Rock wrote:

From my notes...
See if any of it applies to what you are asking...

With a typical water content of 20%, liquid malt extract has a calculated volume of 10.6 fl. oz. per pound (692 mL/kg).For DME, a very reasonable average value for the gravities used in brewing is 9.42 fl. oz. per pound (614.2 mL/kg). That is, 1.0 lb. (0.45 kg) of dried malt extract added to the wort will increase the volume by 9.42 fl. oz. (or 1.0 kg will increase the volume by 614.2 mL).

Specific Gravity
dried malt extract: not a liquid
liquid malt extract: approximately 1.450

Weight per U.S. gallon
dried malt extract:
very approximately 5.8 lbs. (0.69 kg/L)
liquid malt extract:
very approximately 12.0 lbs. (1.43 kg/L)

Weight per 1 cup (8 fl. oz.)
dried malt extract: very approximately 5.8 oz. (0.69 g/mL)
liquid malt extract: very approximately. 12.1 oz. (1.4 g/mL)

Volume of 1.0 lb.
dried malt extract: very approximately 2.75 cups or 22 fl. oz.
liquid malt extract: very approximately 1.3 cups or 10.6 fl oz.

Volume of 1.0 kg
dried malt extract: very approximately 1420 mL
liquid malt extract: very approximately. 700 mL

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Found this online, it has most of the info needed to determine pretty much anything about your beer.

Hope you guys like it


EDIT: So it didnt let me upload it, its a huge file.Here

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Well, that's just about the coolest thing I've ever seen. Gotta get that blown up and laminated.

Oh, and welcome to the borg ScubaSteve. Beat dag to it! :hammer:

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:borg: Welcome to the BeerBorg Information Center. You will be Assimilated. Resistance is quite Futile: we have beer.

I have to teach class tonight SenorPepe...I was taking a nap. :P

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SenorPepe wrote:

Well, that's just about the coolest thing I've ever seen. Gotta get that blown up and laminated.

Oh, and welcome to the borg ScubaSteve. Beat dag to it! :hammer:

+1 on that SP. Coolest thing I've ever seen as well. Need that in a poster and laminated.

Nice Find Scubasteve!!

:banana:

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That poster has been around since '97. By what I've read, the publisher of it went out of business, so there is no way to purchase it (as far as I can tell).

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mashani wrote:

I stumbled upon this nifty hop chart, and thought it could be useful to others.

Hop Variety Databook

Wow, that's quite a bit of information they provide on each hop. Not as easy for comparison between hops as some of the early hop chart posts, but it's a great resource for more detail. Without it I wouldn't have known Hallertau is susceptible to German Wilt, which caused a good bit of its acreage to be taken over and used for Hersbrucken. Does it matter? no. But maybe it'll be a Jeopardy question someday... (one can only hope)

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packerduf wrote:

mashani wrote:

I stumbled upon this nifty hop chart, and thought it could be useful to others.

Hop Variety Databook

Bookmarked!!! Thanks.

Bookmarked hell!
DOWNLOADED!

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Zobl wrote:

packerduf wrote:

mashani wrote:

I stumbled upon this nifty hop chart, and thought it could be useful to others.

Hop Variety Databook

Bookmarked!!! Thanks.

Bookmarked hell!
DOWNLOADED!

Good call. Me too now.

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I did a quick scan of the thread and didn't see this gem anywhere:

Bottling Calculator

It will break down the amount of bottles you'll need of various types for the volume of beer you have brewed. Randomly stumbled upon it looking up corny kegs. Sorry if it's a repost.

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That's a good tool for mixing bottles. I have a similar app on my Android.

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Since I've been having fun with pellicles, drinking a brew right now that had one (it's good) and having my split batch of Citra blonde form one in one of the LBKs, I've been reading a lot about mad scientist brewing. And I found this thing full of charts and graphs that show what will ferment in various conditions, what compounds they will produce, and what will kill them.

What other things can ferment your beer besides yeast in what conditions

The good news - as most uf us have read/learned, most everything that is bad for you dies fast. And here are charts that show when and why.

The bad news - most everything else will happily ferment your beer if there is still something left for it to ferment when your yeast is done, unless you reach very high alcahol levels. So really pitching more/happy yeast won't prevent an infection as some like to believe, just control it (if the yeast eat 99% of fermentables, then the infection can only make a little bit of whatever it does, and it might make enough alcahol or change the ph to kill some of the nastier things faster).

It's a bit geeky and sparse, and hard to read where not, but there's not a lot of this stuff out there.

One of most enlightening things I've learned is that many of the infections won't be 'visible', IE form a pellicle or slime coating, until enough oxygen gets into your fermenter. So it would be very easy to bottle a beer that has some infection and not know it until you notice how the beer changes over time. No oxygen = no pellicle.

So I know Screwy would like to reproduce his lemony wheat that had the pellicle one day... all I can figure is like me in this citra blonde, he had the LBK lid on not very tight, so enough oxygen got in for whatever else was in his beer to build that pellicle. Put it on tighter and likely you won't see one before you bottle it unless you leave it in there for a long time. Airlock, probably won't see it at all.

In my case I'm not even sure if the pellicle I have is an infection or just something strange the T-58 does when exposed to oxygen after primary falls if it has some kind of thing to grab ahold of at the surface (which it does in this particular fermenter - see citra blonde thread if interested). It looks just like the one I had in the T-58 wicked monk I'm drinking now, and it's actually very good beer, so I'm hoping that this will work out too.

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mashani wrote:

...So I know Screwy would like to reproduce his lemony wheat that had the pellicle one day... all I can figure is like me in this citra blonde, he had the LBK lid on not very tight, so enough oxygen got in for whatever else was in his beer to build that pellicle. Put it on tighter and likely you won't see one before you bottle it unless you leave it in there for a long time. Airlock, probably won't see it at all.

mashani nice job in researching and sharing your findings with us, this is all great information and an interesting read. Although it's safe for me to say that it's not likely the case with my infamous pellicle batch, the lid was put on tight and the fermentation treated like so many others I'd done before and after it.

From my brewing notes of that batch I can see that I only boiled the honey for 10 minutes, now I typically boil honey additions for at least 25 minutes.

The finishing hops were not weighed down and were added to the wort when the yeast was pitched, now I only add finishing hops after the primary fermentation has completed. By then the healthy amount of alcohol and Co2 in solution and the lower pH of the beer will help ward off the growth of bacteria or wild yeast.

Great job on researching this further and sharing your findings with us here. While I may never know exactly what caused that batch to do what it did your research definitely leaves the door open to some other possible causes.

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FD suggested I post this here so I am:

Found this source while surfing this morning. (Jeesh! This beer thing is really, truely becoming an obsession.)

www.probrewer.com/resources/malt/

Scroll down the the "Malt Varities and Characteristics" section and there's a whole lot of useful information.

Edit to add:

While doing some further reading on that same site, I found this:

www.brewingtechniques.com/library/backis...issue1.2/lodahl.html

Veeerrry interesting.

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As more people get into kegging, this chart comes in handy for knowing what PSI to use at which temperature to achieve your desired CO2 volumes.

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Great reference sites for Grains, Hops, and Yeasts
www.onebeer.net/yeaststrains_ale.html
www.onebeer.net/yeaststrains_lager.html
www.onebeer.net/hopschart.html
www.onebeer.net/grainchart.html

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Found this great site for those who are a little farther along in their brewing careers. Even for those that aren't there are some great things on the site people might find useful. I just dropped about $200 on the site so I can put together the kegs I plan on using for my beer stand.

Check it out!
http://www.brewhardware.com/

These are great for glass carboys to mark the water lines as well :)
http://www.brewhardware.com/vinyl-decals/71-carboy-calibration-numbers

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"mashani" post=265506 said:

D Rabbit, you might like this one too:

http://morebeerpro.com/

From a quick browse I think I looked there previously. No one comes close to that site I posted for keg conversions or pot conversions. The same ball valve on your site was $9 cheaper through the other site. I will definitely keep your site for other fun toys :)

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A question came up on how to figure out how many yeast cells were in a jar of washed yeast.

This will help you figure it out:

www.wyeastlab.com/com-yeast-harvest.cfm

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