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Tabasco

My first AG BIAB

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Drinking all the homebrew last night put me in the need to brew. But, I had planned on my first AG being my next brew. DARE I??????? Muuuuaaa haaaa haaaa haaaa

Well, the strainer sure fits the pot good ... and plenty loose to stir grains ....
SDC12558.jpg
Temp seems to hold, being that I've gotten real familiar with the stove from all this brewing this year ...
What should I put into 165 deg water ??? Wait, I know! Four pounds of cracked two row and a quarter pound crystal 40 ... that'll drop it to 155 deg! Wee!
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This is gettin me in the mood for some nice strong centennials
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Good Lord do I, Tabrewsco, love hops! Jumpin' Jehosophat!
Well, the mash went well, I was able to keep between 152-158.
So, at the end of the mash, let's recirculate by lifting, letting back down ...lifting, down ... groan I might have to do this for a minute ...
SDC12570.jpg

Then a quick "pseudo sparge" by dunking in a separate pot (not pictured) of 170 deg water, then pour that water to the main wort, which now looks like this. I looks like floaties in this pic, but it wasn't. That bag is one hell of a strainer. And it cost a dollar fifty (two for three) at home depot. Reusable.

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Getting close to boil ....

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I forgot to take a pic of the rolling boil, but you know the rest. I'll level with you though,

- It made me nervous cooling it down. Sink bath. I just made it. I got it cool enough to pour into fermenter, and luckily it had boiled down to a point that I need to add a bit more cold water, so it worked out. But I may have pitched when it was still pretty warm. I went downstairs this morning and there's a nice krausen so I made it. But, I'm going to come up with a more effective cool down somehow. A small wort cooler might be in line, but I'm trying to avoid work, and cleanup.

On my first go at this, my efficiency was off. Not because of the techniques you see here, I think they work fine. But, I went over 160 deg to maybe 170 for about a minute with a bit to go in the mash ... because of sheer stupidity ... the stove was behaving nicely, and well, let's just say I got control dial happy. I will never do that again. So, it might have ended the mash about 80% into it. But, a complete success, because although my OG was a bit off the mark, it should be tasty if a little tame, and the next one will be right on the mark.

The sparge in seperate pot at 170 deg is a great move, but I should have just used a gallon in that pot instead of a gal and a half, because it's a smaller pot. I'm not paying fifty bucks for ANOTHER 16 qt pot.

I think I have my method down EXCEPT

I may try pouring 165 deg water into my little rectangular cooler and adding the grain right to that, and let it mash for an hour, then pour it all into the pot through the strainer. Then I won't have to baby sit the stove. We'll see, but it's nice to know the stove works out fine.

Brew on.

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Just an FYI, I bought my 16 quart pot at Ocean State Job Lot for like 15-20 bucks. Would work great for your sparge pot, it worked great for my main pot for a few batches and than my sparge pot for one. Now it will work great to get my sparge water to temp for my first AG batch in a couple weeks! :)

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D Rabbit wrote:

Just an FYI, I bought my 16 gallon pot at Ocean State Job Lot for like 15-20 bucks. Would work great for your sparge pot, it worked great for my main pot for a few batches and than my sparge pot for one. Now it will work great to get my sparge water to temp for my first AG batch in a couple weeks! :)

Thanks, I also just realised an aluminum pot would be fine for a sparge pot, there's no boil. I may just pick one of those up at the discount store real cheap.

It's nice that I got the main pot stainless steel. But, however, I've heard many folks say they brew with aluminum pot with no off flavors at all. You gotta try things for yourself sometimes.

Also, I'm neglecting ph ... that could be hitting the efficiency, too, but there's some nice folks in a LHBS here that can cut that to the chase, I'll talk to them next week.
The chapter in How to Home Brew on ph and minerals is a bit over my head. I've always gotten kick ass extract beer with my tap water, but I may have to adjust for mash. We'll see.
I looked at this one as an experiment that cost six bucks for the grain, but looks like I got a batch of beer to boot.

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Yea, I almost fell in love at Wally World the other day.... saw an 8 Gallon Pot for under 60 bucks, than realized it was Aluminum. I'm gonna stray from Aluminum for my main pot since there is always a chance of something happening with it. Since SS is foolproof i'll go with that.

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Yeah, this is definitely my next adventure... Thanks for the pics, Tab. I have a nice rectangular cooler that I'm considering converting for this purpose as well...

Where are those bags located at in the Depot?

btw... you threw me there with your name change... I thought our troll friend who was posting with variations of everyone's screen names was back again... ;)

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swenocha wrote:

Yeah, this is definitely my next adventure... Thanks for the pics, Tab. I have a nice rectangular cooler that I'm considering converting for this purpose as well...

Where are those bags located at in the Depot?

btw... you threw me there with your name change... I thought our troll friend who was posting with variations of everyone's screen names was back again... ;)

They are paint strainers in the paint dept. Don't waste time looking for them, jusk ask someone where the 5 gal paint strainers are.

I don't plan on doing anything to convert my cooler ... it's small, will hold a gal and a half of water with hopefully enough room for the grain, or I'll use my other one that's slightly bigger. I won't put the strainer in there, I'll add the grain directly and stir. Then, at end of mash, pour into pot through the strainer. We'll see if that works out, at least I know I can mash on the stove now, though.

I still have to get better at the sparge and the cool down. But just the fact that I know what to improve is great.

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Great post man!!

I have not stepped up to all grain yet, but I think you could make the cooler work, I have been really trying to tighten my cooler processes up lately. A few ideas, if you give it a go; First, preheat the cooler. A gallon of boiling water with the lid on for half an hour while you clean and get organized does the trick just fine, and it makes a huge difference. Second, push the strike temp...start at the highest temp you are comfortable with. Unless you are really doing a step mash, which I would not try in the cooler anyway, your target mash temp is 158, so if you start at 180 (Don't freak -- you are gonna loose a lot of that instantly as the water moves through the air on the trip from stove into cooler) you will likely end up in the cooler, grains added, at about 165...by the time you stir it all up, you should be very close to 160. Stir another minute or two to fine tune, then pop the lid on.

As for cooling, I find my ice bath works great. I use almost no water...maybe half an inch in the bottom of the sink as a buffer to set the pot down...then I surround the pot with an entire 10 lb bag of ice, then fill with as much cold tap water as the sink will still hold, which is not much. Constantly stir the pot gently, which rocking it back and forth to keep the water in the sink circulating as well...constant motion is your best friend here. 15 minutes from boiling to 70. By the time I top up with ice water, I am pitching at 65ish.

Brew Pots...I got mine (on a recommendation from LHBS) at Big Lots...less than 20, stainless steel. Works awesome. Word.

Brew On!!

David

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SiriusDG wrote:


Brew Pots...I got mine (on a recommendation from LHBS) at Big Lots...less than 20, stainless steel. Works awesome. Word.


David

I got a nice one many, many years ago at Big Lots for less that $10 (I only know that because the price tag is burned onto the bottom and you can still read it)... and then totally forgot about it when looking for equipment to brew with and bought another one at Wally. After discovering the other pot in the garage, I now am covered for a two-pot stovetop setup...

Big Lots is definitely worth a look...

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The ice bath would defineately be better, but if I gotta run out and buy a 10 lb bag of ice every time I make AG ... I'd rather get a wort cooler.

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Oh, yeah, the ice and water is just a standard part of my pre-brewing ritual. Fortunately for me he grocery store is just around the corner.

David

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Tabrewsco wrote:

- It made me nervous cooling it down. Sink bath. I just made it. I got it cool enough to pour into fermenter, and luckily it had boiled down to a point that I need to add a bit more cold water, so it worked out. But I may have pitched when it was still pretty warm. I went downstairs this morning and there's a nice krausen so I made it. But, I'm going to come up with a more effective cool down somehow. A small wort cooler might be in line, but I'm trying to avoid work, and cleanup.

I made mine

wortchiller.jpg

for less than $20 if I recall correctly.
Works great!

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Okay, this will sound stupid, but...so, you put that in the wort in the brewpot, and then what...hook it up to the tap and just run cold tap water through it? No way in hell that would work for me...water comes out of my tap at 72 degrees, even at night. So the lowest I would ever get, in perfect theory, is 72, not low enough, and in reality, the delta and innefficiency and small surface are, I bet I could not get lower than 80. Damn shame...

David

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SiriusDG wrote:

Okay, this will sound stupid, but...so, you put that in the wort in the brewpot, and then what...hook it up to the tap and just run cold tap water through it? No way in hell that would work for me...water comes out of my tap at 72 degrees, even at night. So the lowest I would ever get, in perfect theory, is 72, not low enough, and in reality, the delta and innefficiency and small surface are, I bet I could not get lower than 80. Damn shame...

David

those things work. The point of them is that, due to the coil configuration, there is actually a lot of surface area, and the wort doesn't warm up the water in them because it's always new water. I've never heard anyone that had one say it didn't work. You don't need to get lower than 80. You get close to that, pour it in the fermenter.

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wortchiller.jpg
I also run the first hose through an ice bath to help get the water temp down a few more degrees. Works nicely.

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Great post Tabasco. Zobl's chiller looks a lot nicer than mine, but it still cools 5-6 gallons in a half hour. It doesn't fit in my smaller pot which I use for mini mashes, so I put the pot in a sink full of cold water, and add ice from the freezer. Leave the water trickling (just like thawing a turkey) and you should be able to cool around three gallons in the same half hour, adding ice as necessary and stirring the wort on occasion. I'm too cheap to buy ice, but I've never needed to either.
I've read that infections can come from tap water (especially well water like ours), so it's a good idea to cover the pot so the trickling water doesn't splash into the wort.

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Congrats Tabasco - the BIAB is what I've been using for my AG recipes and my best beer to date has come from using that technique.

I agree with Zobl - you can make a wort chiller for under about $20 and it helps a lot with the cool down.

The head and lacing difference with the AG is nothing short of phenomenal - plus it's another cool feeling to know that you made the beer from scratch.

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SiriusDG wrote:

Okay, this will sound stupid, but...so, you put that in the wort in the brewpot, and then what...hook it up to the tap and just run cold tap water through it? No way in hell that would work for me...water comes out of my tap at 72 degrees, even at night. So the lowest I would ever get, in perfect theory, is 72, not low enough, and in reality, the delta and innefficiency and small surface are, I bet I could not get lower than 80. Damn shame...

David

I use a cooler filled with ice and water and use a pond pump to push water through the wort chiller, and then run the other end of the wort chiller back to the cooler saves on water and cools pretty fast.

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Tabrewsco wrote:

D Rabbit wrote:

Just an FYI, I bought my 16 gallon pot at Ocean State Job Lot for like 15-20 bucks. Would work great for your sparge pot, it worked great for my main pot for a few batches and than my sparge pot for one. Now it will work great to get my sparge water to temp for my first AG batch in a couple weeks! :)

Thanks, I also just realised an aluminum pot would be fine for a sparge pot, there's no boil. I may just pick one of those up at the discount store real cheap.

It's nice that I got the main pot stainless steel. But, however, I've heard many folks say they brew with aluminum pot with no off flavors at all. You gotta try things for yourself sometimes.

Also, I'm neglecting ph ... that could be hitting the efficiency, too, but there's some nice folks in a LHBS here that can cut that to the chase, I'll talk to them next week.
The chapter in How to Home Brew on ph and minerals is a bit over my head. I've always gotten kick ass extract beer with my tap water, but I may have to adjust for mash. We'll see.
I looked at this one as an experiment that cost six bucks for the grain, but looks like I got a batch of beer to boot.

Next time you are at your LHBS get some 5.2 PH stabilizer. It should help with your ph worries.

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mxstar21 wrote:


I use a cooler filled with ice and water and use a pond pump to push water through the wort chiller, and then run the other end of the wort chiller back to the cooler saves on water and cools pretty fast.

Great idea ...I might have to rig something like this up! It would save quite a bit of water

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I bottled it last night. It looked very light, and very clear. Now, this one, I had to take a taste. Seemed fine. Once it's carbed, it ain't gonna get conditioned much, I'll leap frog over the others to drink this one, just for the psychic thing, he heh.

It hit just over 4% ABV ... it should have been higher, but like I say, I know why, and the next one that I'll do this weekend, I should come close to gravity target, even if it's not that effecient of a process. But you can't do it at night after work, it takes too long, and you need to be rested to be patient.

I still love my UME, and sometimes HME things. Yesterday, I got a message from Mr. Beer that my stuff is shipped. I got the next seasonal (ya gotta!) and, I'm also trying their wheat deluxe refill, I forgot the name already.

BTW, Screwy ... you don't see it in my pics, but covering the mash pot and sliding off the burner holds the temp a long time, then if it starts to drop, and it will do that SLOWLY, you can just slide it back on, the burner never needed to be above "low" once I was at mash temp.

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Tabrewsco wrote:

SiriusDG wrote:

Okay, this will sound stupid, but...so, you put that in the wort in the brewpot, and then what...hook it up to the tap and just run cold tap water through it? No way in hell that would work for me...water comes out of my tap at 72 degrees, even at night. So the lowest I would ever get, in perfect theory, is 72, not low enough, and in reality, the delta and innefficiency and small surface are, I bet I could not get lower than 80. Damn shame...

David

those things work. The point of them is that, due to the coil configuration, there is actually a lot of surface area, and the wort doesn't warm up the water in them because it's always new water. I've never heard anyone that had one say it didn't work. You don't need to get lower than 80. You get close to that, pour it in the fermenter.

+1 I get my wort to 80 in less than 15 minutes with tap water (keep in mind that I live in AZ and it's Summer). I then seal everything up and throw it into the fermentation fridge until it drops to the desired pitching temp. Pitch my starter and in about 4 hours I will see activity.

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Well I did my second AG BIAB last night. The OG was off again. I mean, I'm sure I'll get a nice, 4+% ABV ale, but I used enough grain to get 5%, and maybe this method is really "settling".

I think the lack of a good sparge process is hurting it, but it was still worth doing, I'm getting good krausens, and I can't wait to taste. But, to be honest, my efficiency blows. I mean, it has to be 65-70%, although I'm too lazy to do the math.
Knowing that the OG is a good 10% less than the 80% efficiency recipe is all I need to know.

But, like I say, this beer is probably going to taste good, and I could just use another lb of grain next time to get the gravity ... 2 row is only $1.50 for a pound at LHBS, so it will still be a lot less $ than extract, and more fun to brew (IF you have the time).

I can see me making a lauter tun and getting a burner and big pot before the end of the year. I might even consider a 4 gallon batch and putting it in two MrB fermenters.

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Tabasco, is this a Mr Beer batch size. If so why don't you construct a mini mash tun out of a 2 to 3 gallon rubbermaid water cooler. and follow the procedures for mashing. It is just one more piece of equipment to purchase and construct. I bet your would go up tremendously by batch sparing. I think the results will be well worth it. I bet you could build one for under thirty dollars. The con is it cost more than the bag for BIAB but I think It would pay for it self by not having to buy more grains to raise the efficiency of your present process. I plan to try this out soon as I don't see myself making any more than a MRBeer size batch for quite some time, but I would like to incorporate some of the more advanced brewing procedures into what I am doing now with MRBeer. Just my .02.

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Tabasco wrote:

Well I did my second AG BIAB last night. The OG was off again. I mean, I'm sure I'll get a nice, 4+% ABV ale, but I used enough grain to get 5%, and maybe this method is really "settling".

I think the lack of a good sparge process is hurting it, but it was still worth doing, I'm getting good krausens, and I can't wait to taste. But, to be honest, my efficiency blows. I mean, it has to be 65-70%, although I'm too lazy to do the math.
Knowing that the OG is a good 10% less than the 80% efficiency recipe is all I need to know.

But, like I say, this beer is probably going to taste good, and I could just use another lb of grain next time to get the gravity ... 2 row is only $1.50 for a pound at LHBS, so it will still be a lot less $ than extract, and more fun to brew (IF you have the time).

I can see me making a lauter tun and getting a burner and big pot before the end of the year. I might even consider a 4 gallon batch and putting it in two MrB fermenters.

I've been toying with this idea over the last week or so. I want to brew up my American IPA but I have my Fermenter already filled since I only have 1 Fermenting Bucket due to space and 2 Mr. B kegs. Thinking about doing a batch big enough to split between the two kegs and trying 2 different yeasts with them to see how much the yeast can effect the fermentation.

If you do it let me know how it turns out!

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D Rabbit wrote:

Thinking about doing a batch big enough to split between the two kegs and trying 2 different yeasts with them to see how much the yeast can effect the fermentation.

Yeah, that's pretty much what I did on my last one... Did each of three fermenters split with different yeast (s-33, s-04, us-05), though I did some different hops. Anxious to see how it turns out...

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BadHorsie wrote:

Tabasco, is this a Mr Beer batch size. If so why don't you construct a mini mash tun out of a 2 to 3 gallon rubbermaid water cooler. and follow the procedures for mashing. It is just one more piece of equipment to purchase and construct. I bet your would go up tremendously by batch sparing. I think the results will be well worth it. I bet you could build one for under thirty dollars. The con is it cost more than the bag for BIAB but I think It would pay for it self by not having to buy more grains to raise the efficiency of your present process. I plan to try this out soon as I don't see myself making any more than a MRBeer size batch for quite some time, but I would like to incorporate some of the more advanced brewing procedures into what I am doing now with MRBeer. Just my .02.

I'm going to have a tun at some point, probably soon. At this point, I'm enjoying going from grain to bottle using only a pot, a strain bag, and a MrBeer fermenter ... the feeling of victory is incredible, and BTW, two row is a buck and a half a pound, the brews, even with extra grain, are half the cost of extracts. I'm just sayin'. And I'm not transferring from pot to tun, back to pot, yada yada. But I'll be doing that soon enough. I am in no rush to start washing, sanitizing extra equipment. I'm a busy man commuting to the city every day. And this works. It really does. All grain. Mr Beer fermenter. Too much.

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D Rabbit wrote:

I've been toying with this idea over the last week or so. I want to brew up my American IPA but I have my Fermenter already filled since I only have 1 Fermenting Bucket due to space and 2 Mr. B kegs. Thinking about doing a batch big enough to split between the two kegs and trying 2 different yeasts with them to see how much the yeast can effect the fermentation.

If you do it let me know how it turns out!

Now that sounds like a plan. I love side by side analyses. At one point, I thought I proved that granulated sugar bottle carbs better than corn sugar, but heh heh, I think that will stay a mystery ...

BTW ... the BIAB thing ... I'm not saying it's an end goal. It's just that you can do grain brewing with it, and it is a learning experience ... the big propane burner, the lauter tuns, the big fermenter and secondary .... I just can't get to all that now. In the meantime, I've made a few all grain batches. Let's see how they taste when they're finally conditioned.

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Ok, update ... I've done three BIAB's. I started this thread, not to toot a horn, because I started out knowing almost nothing about it. But I have some observations, so I'll post again.

1. BIAB is worth the time once you figure how to get "efficient". To try and make that happen, crack the grain more (it's gonna sit in a strainer), and although you're not supposed to really, squeeze the bag some when draining.

2. Just turn the bag inside out and rinse to clean it.

3. If you do it on the stove like me, it's not hard, especially if you have a glass top electric. I did a test with plain water first, knowing that my strike temp would have to be higher when I actually went to put grain in.

4. BIAB presents two challenges. Boiling a full quantity MrB size batch, takes my electric to the limit. I have to leave the cover on the pot at times, but I can keep a boil going. So, it works, but forget a five gal batch without extra cooking equipment (you already know this).

5. Cooling down. I do just make it in 20-25 minutes. But, I am going to get a wort chiller soon. With my schedule, going to home depot for copper and fixtures ... it may be worth biting the price bullet and just buying a wort chiller at LHBS. I mean, I commute to the city every day ... to get a slop sink in my basement, I'll likely spend a few more and hire a plumber. Just get 'er done.

6. The main point .. we all know .. extract brewing rocks. Yah, it cost more, but you get excellent brews and time is money. Those who say extract brewing isn't real brewing are full of shit. I was excited yesterday when my seasonal brown was on the steps when I got home. We all understand what happens when you mash. To mash or not is a personal choice ... but I will tell you another thing you already know, it is fun.

7. BIAB doesn't stop you from wanting a big pot, burner, tun, yada yada. But, you can go from grain to bottle with only a pot in the kitchen and a MrBeer fermenter. Really. Without issues. It works.

8. I brew often, even though I don't have the time. I don't have the time to ride my motorcycle or go to the beach either, but I get them in. Chores I pass on to a fault. The frequency that you brew does not make you a brew master. The level of enjoyment that you get does. Brewing rocks. If you really like it, you have succeeded, whether you brew twice a month or eight. I think we all can agree on that. If you run low, there's always craft beers, and we love many of them, and it's a great way to get bottles.

Thank you for listening.

P.S. I was looking at the MrBeer recipes today, at a doppel something, and I thought there was a mistake with the color rating. But no, I realised later, the Creamy Brown UME does get you dark. Carry on.

I could recommend some good LME's and DME's, but the MrBeer product line ... you do pay a bit more (I would like to see some better bargains), but the combinations and possiblities are always tempting. I leave nothing out of consideration at this point. I'd still like to see MrBeer come out with a competitively priced 3.3 lb can of UME.

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Excellent expression of your opinions & obvservations Tabasco.
That was a good read!

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I made my own wort chiller because I can't stand running to the Acme or Seven Eleven just to buy ice.

ScrewyCoolerSink2.jpg
Sanitize he Sink And The Coil Too.

Plus it works really good and I get to say it's my design. :drinking:

Tabasco, Thank you for taking the time to post such a well articulated post about brewing in a bag,. I've just recently stepped up to brewing recipes with steeping grains and DME. By reading your post I feel like I can tackle BIAB relatively easy now.

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I love BIAB :) I have done 8 batches so far and have met or exceeded OG on all but 1. Biggest tip is when crushing grains is to send through mill twice, there is no risk of stuff getting through the mesh. The other tip I have read about is to mash for like 10 minutes longer. When I remove the grains I place in another pot on top of one of those cheap steamer thingies and gather whatever runs off.

Just my 2-cents, I cant see myself changing any time soon unless I feel the need to step mash or I find a great deal on craigslist :)

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Tobias wrote:

I love BIAB :) I have done 8 batches so far and have met or exceeded OG on all but 1. Biggest tip is when crushing grains is to send through mill twice, there is no risk of stuff getting through the mesh. The other tip I have read about is to mash for like 10 minutes longer. When I remove the grains I place in another pot on top of one of those cheap steamer thingies and gather whatever runs off.

Just my 2-cents, I cant see myself changing any time soon unless I feel the need to step mash or I find a great deal on craigslist :)

That is an excellent reply, and I really thank you. You, too, Screwy Brewer. You guys rock.

Tobias, I've read that you are on the mark when you say grind it twice, or, if you have your own grinder, adjust the setting. And, I did leave my last one mashing ten minutes longer .. intuitively! I hit my hoped for OG! But, that was at like 65% efficiency, I really want to be able to say I routinely go over 70%, next one will, I'm sure. "Squeeze the bag a little when draining" is another tip.

My only two concerns remain boiling 2.5 gals of water on the electric ( I was doing 1.5 gals, then adding cold water to the fermenter, which is why my efficiency got down to 60), and also cooling down ... but, Screwy Brewer has already supplied the answer to that. Building your own chiller is more cost effective and fun, but I may have to buy one at this point ... my commute to work is killing me ... I'll bring my tape measure next time I go to LHBS.

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That's a super awesome wort chiller!! Just a perfect fit for your sink!

Mind doing a separate post on how you did it?

Screwy Brewer wrote:

I made my own wort chiller because I can't stand running to the Acme or Seven Eleven just to buy ice.

ScrewyCoolerSink2.jpg
Sanitize he Sink And The Coil Too.

Plus it works really good and I get to say it's my design. :drinking:

Tabasco, Thank you for taking the time to post such a well articulated post about brewing in a bag,. I've just recently stepped up to brewing recipes with steeping grains and DME. By reading your post I feel like I can tackle BIAB relatively easy now.

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Tabasco wrote:

Tobias wrote:

I love BIAB :) I have done 8 batches so far and have met or exceeded OG on all but 1. Biggest tip is when crushing grains is to send through mill twice, there is no risk of stuff getting through the mesh.

Tobias, I've read that you are on the mark when you say grind it twice, or, if you have your own grinder, adjust the setting.

FWIW, I wouldn't worry too much about this. I say this because the last BIAB I did was a kit from my LHBS which was an all-organic kit containing half grain and half LME.

I doubt the grain was run through twice as it was meant for a "normal" mash but I hit the OG dead on. I'm not saying don't do it, just don't panic if you forget.

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Kealia wrote

"FWIW, I wouldn't worry too much about this. I say this because the last BIAB I did was a kit from my LHBS which was an all-organic kit containing half grain and half LME.

I doubt the grain was run through twice as it was meant for a "normal" mash but I hit the OG dead on. I'm not saying don't do it, just don't panic if you forget."

That was an AG batch you did from the hippie store? Thought it was a partial mash...anyway they probably read poetry and sang folk songs to the grains to increase efficiency :)

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rniles wrote:

That's a super awesome wort chiller!! Just a perfect fit for your sink!

Mind doing a separate post on how you did it?

Screwy Brewer wrote:

I made my own wort chiller because I can't stand running to the Acme or Seven Eleven just to buy ice.

ScrewyCoolerSink2.jpg
Sanitize he Sink And The Coil Too.

Plus it works really good and I get to say it's my design. :drinking:

Tabasco, Thank you for taking the time to post such a well articulated post about brewing in a bag,. I've just recently stepped up to brewing recipes with steeping grains and DME. By reading your post I feel like I can tackle BIAB relatively easy now.

I would also like to see a thread on this.

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So, the first AG was carbed 13 days today ... mua hah hah.

No condition .. this is the first BIAB, efficiency off, but hit 4% ABV not bad, first try.

I chilled a few down in the freezer .. so, the were not chilled long, not conditioned ... no adjuncts .... grain ...

I'm hooked.

Nice lacing ... will only get better if I wait.

Taste great.

Funny thing, I use a whole ounce of centennials ... but, because there wasn't as much to "grab onto" as a heavy DME beer, it isn't all that hoppy, but hoppy enough.

I got a few more AG's ... one I bottled tonight ... that are going to be even better ... with better cracking, mashing, etc efficiency will be totally worth it.

I should not be allowed to have this much fun.

P.S. HME's still rock. I'm not trying to be PC. I can't make a better oatmeal stout than Sticky Wicket ... well, I can keep trying, heh heh.

BTW, these AG fuckers are clear ... no racking, no cold crashing, etc., but danged clear ..

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Hands down my AG has the best head and lacing of any beer that I've brewed so far. And as luck would have it, I'm having one right now.

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So, Tabasco (or anyone else that's done this)...

I have a question before I embark on this project (maybe this weekend) related to H20 volume... How much water do you use? You may have covered this along the way, but I've read two rules of thumb in my reading on the BIAB. One is that you add your entire volume to the pot for the mash and bypass a sparge, and the other is more along the line of what you've done. How did you decide how much to mash with and how much to sparge with?

Here's my recipe... I'm guessing someone on the board will recognize it as it's darn near identical to his recent project..


Type: All Grain
Date: 10/4/2010
Batch Size: 2.40 gal
Brewer: Swenocha
Boil Size: 3.02 gal
Boil Time: 60 min
Brewhouse Efficiency: 75.00

Ingredients

Amount Item Type % or IBU
4.50 lb Pale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM) Grain 78.53 %
0.60 lb Caramel/Crystal Malt - 60L (60.0 SRM) Grain 10.47 %
0.50 lb Caramunich Malt (56.0 SRM) Grain 8.73 %
0.13 lb Melanoiden Malt (20.0 SRM) Grain 2.27 %
0.45 oz Columbus (Tomahawk) [14.00 %] (60 min) Hops 42.7 IBU
0.25 oz Warrior [15.00 %] (30 min) Hops 19.5 IBU
0.50 oz Centennial [10.00 %] (5 min) Hops 6.8 IBU
0.50 oz Centennial [10.00 %] (Dry Hop 3 days) Hops -
1 Pkgs American Ale Yeast (DCL Yeast #US-05) Yeast-Ale



Beer Profile

Est Original Gravity: 1.064 SG
Est Final Gravity: 1.018 SG
Estimated Alcohol by Vol: 5.97 %
Bitterness: 69.0 IBU
Est Color: 15.9


Mash Profile

Weight: 5.73 lb
Mash PH: 5.4 PH

Single Infusion, Medium Body, No Mash Out Step Time Name Description Step Temp
60 min Mash In Add 12.04 qt of water at 161.1 F 154.0 F

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I have used 3.75 gallons of water on my last 3 AG BIAB for a 60 minute boil. All 3 times after filling keg it goes right up to the bottom of the "Q" which is about 2.4 gallons of wort.

I dont do any sort of sparge just full volume boil and have hit OG most of the time.

my 2 cents

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My first AG BIAB was the same 3.75 gallons - likely because Tobias came over and walked me through it ;)

Since then, I've used a bit less water and then sparged with 170 degree water post-mash. I don't recall how much less, but it was liekly about .75 - 1 gallon for the sparge.

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Hey, Tobias (or Kealia)... you wanna come over this weekend and walk me thru it? ;)

That sounds like a good starting point. I had put in 3 gallons just for calculation purposes, so I guess if I decide to sparge that would be about right.

Thanks for the info, gents...

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I think that the water to grain ratio is a bit high if you start with all 13 quarts.

When I did my first PM I did a stove top mash and used a grain sack. I started with 4 quarts of water for 3lbs of grain. Your using almost double what I used. You should be closer to 8 quarts for a proper mash.

I than sparged with another 4 quarts in another pot. Again if you were to do that you could probably use closer to 6-8 quarts to get to your proper volume.

Remember that with that amount of grains you will likely lose about .5 quart per pound of grain to the grains sucking up the water. So your 3 gallons of liquid will be down to about 2.5 gallons before you start your boil, in which you will probably lose another 1-2 quarts in boil off.

Just something to keep in mind.

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swenocha wrote:

Hey, Tobias (or Kealia)... you wanna come over this weekend and walk me thru it? ;)

That sounds like a good starting point. I had put in 3 gallons just for calculation purposes, so I guess if I decide to sparge that would be about right.

Thanks for the info, gents...

Next flight to TN, huh? :laugh:

Based on all of the posts that I've seen from you over the past 10 months, I wouldn't worry too much abut this. I think you'll be just fine. Just remember what we always tell the new kids - don't over-think it.

I just went through that again with my yeast-harvesting. I was thinking that it would be really difficult, confusing, etc. and once I got into it, turns out that it's pretty simple.

I'm willing to bet that you're going to be just fine.
Just do it.

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This thread ROCKS, and is yet another example why the MB Forum is the BEST beer forum on the Internet - cause you'ze guyz make it that way! :chug:

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