Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
Fat Pete

Priming question..

Recommended Posts

I have read the term batch priming in here on more than a few occasions and I was wondering if this sounds like a good idea for an extreme newbie such as myself for my next batch...

My version of batch priming in my kitchen...

So I have my brew that has been in the fermenting barrel for 2 or so weeks and it now tastes like flat beer.

By my calculations I should get 22 - 12 OZ bottle from this batch.

So being the math whiz I am, I multiply 3/4 of a teaspoon (for the priming corn sugar) x 22 bottles and I come up with 16.5 teaspoons which breaks out to a 1/4 cup plus 4 1/2 teaspoons of corn sugar.

I measure that out and place it over there...on the table that's where...

Next, I gently place my Mr Beer fermenting barrel on the counter and empty it via the spigot into a sanitized stainless steel pot.

I empty the measured priming sugar into said pot and stir it on up.

Next, I empty the stainless steel pot into another Mr Beer fermenting barrel (cleaned and sanitized of course)and hence forth begin filling my bottles (also sanitized) from the spigot.

I then cap with sanitized caps and put them away for two weeks to prime before conditioning.

Sound OK?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

put your sugar in a small pan, along with 1/2 cup water. bring to boil, mix well. set said pan in fidge to cool down. prep keg containing beer in position to pour directly into 2nd keg (no need for the ss pot) once priming sugar water is cooled, put in 2nd keg. Drain primary into 2nd and let it mix. bottle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Use the site. Makes life much easier. Match your beer style the sugar type. Myself I normally use honey or dme.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesn't matter if you're a newbie. I batch primed my very first batch, and with one exception, I'm sticking with it.

Just remember to mix very gently when you mix the beer with the sugar. The only time you want air mixing in your beer is when you pitch your yeast.

I use a priming bucket that I bought online (although using another keg will work just as well). To ensure the best mixing I can, I drain a gallon into the priming bucket, then add the priming sugar/water mixture, stir very gently, and drain the rest of the keg.

No problems so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yankeedag wrote:

put your sugar in a small pan, along with 1/2 cup water. bring to boil, mix well. set said pan in fidge to cool down. prep keg containing beer in position to pour directly into 2nd keg (no need for the ss pot) once priming sugar water is cooled, put in 2nd keg. Drain primary into 2nd and let it mix. bottle.

What if he doesn't have a "fidge"? needle, jab, poke LOL

Actually dag, and the others here have given you great advice. Skip the SS pot. Go directly to another keg or bucket that you can fill bottles from, using the procedures like dag and FD mention.

Unless you don't have another MB keg or bucket with a spigot (that just occurred to me)? If that's the case, then (until you get said devices) you may indeed want to transfer to a sanitized pot until you get your keg cleaned out of trub and sanitized again. The precaution to take (as FD mentioned) is to avoid aerating your beer at this stage. Siphoning with tubing might be your only option.

Or bottle prime until you are geared up??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't need that extra pot. Do you have the locking spigot and wand? If you do, here is a pic of how I do my batch priming. batch_priming.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

truckndad wrote:

You don't need that extra pot. Do you have the locking spigot and wand? If you do, here is a pic of how I do my batch priming. batch_priming.jpg

....IF he has two MB kegs!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

truckndad wrote:

You don't need that extra pot. Do you have the locking spigot and wand? If you do, here is a pic of how I do my batch priming. batch_priming.jpg

+1 on the bottling wand and locking spigot truckndad! That's exactly how I would transfer from the primary to the secondary fermenter, or to the batch priming keg....of course I already have 6 kegs, wands and locking spigots though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Zobl wrote:

truckndad wrote:

You don't need that extra pot. Do you have the locking spigot and wand? If you do, here is a pic of how I do my batch priming. batch_priming.jpg

....IF he has two MB kegs!

I've got THREE MB kegs, and they're all working right now. When I'm ready to bottle my Trilby, I'll still have my Scottish Wee Heavy and Jazzberry Ram fermenting, as they're a week behind. And as soon as the Trilby keg is empty, I'm going to brew something else and fill it, so it'll be occupied when the SWH and JR are ready to be bottled.

Get a dedicated priming bucket, sez I, and leave the kegs to do what they're meant to do -- ferment beer!

I do like the bottling wand set-up. Very nifty, that. Although four feet of tubing serves me very well. Kegs on the top shelf of the beer closet, priming bucket on the floor, tubing in between, and gravity does the rest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I planned on ordering another MB Keg and pick up an extra locking spigot...your pic confirmed it for me...Thanks FedoraDave...Not only do I enjoy your posts, but you are also very informative and very willing to share...I appreciate it very much...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hmmmm...actually, by this calculator, I was pretty darn close...my calculation of 16.5 TSP of corn sugar was 2.65 volumes of CO2...

nifty tool, thanks...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As the Screwybrewer said. Definitely use a priming calculator. When batch priming you use less sugar than you do per bottle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FedoraDave wrote:

Zobl wrote:

truckndad wrote:

You don't need that extra pot. Do you have the locking spigot and wand? If you do, here is a pic of how I do my batch priming. batch_priming.jpg

....IF he has two MB kegs!

I've got THREE MB kegs, and they're all working right now. When I'm ready to bottle my Trilby, I'll still have my Scottish Wee Heavy and Jazzberry Ram fermenting, as they're a week behind. And as soon as the Trilby keg is empty, I'm going to brew something else and fill it, so it'll be occupied when the SWH and JR are ready to be bottled.

Get a dedicated priming bucket, sez I, and leave the kegs to do what they're meant to do -- ferment beer!

I do like the bottling wand set-up. Very nifty, that. Although four feet of tubing serves me very well. Kegs on the top shelf of the beer closet, priming bucket on the floor, tubing in between, and gravity does the rest.

I do this setup because I've got five fermenters. Four brewing at once and one dedicated to batch priming. So I kind of did what you're saying here, just using MB kegs for that purpose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey truckndad, does the beer get moving pretty well in your bottling keg while you're racking? I've always been meaning to ask you about this. Does your priming solution mix in pretty well by doing this, or do you give it a stir before bottling? I ask, because I never feel like my bottling wands have a great flow rate.

I've always used a plastic hose hooked up to my spigot, which gives me a pretty good flow rate and I can really get some good whirlpool action in the bottling bucket with it. However, I hate cleaning and storing the hose. I might have to give your method a try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I let a couple cups or so get into the keg first, then pour the priming solution in. After the keg in emptied into the priming keg, I put the lid back on and then give the keg a little swirl as I move it from the chair to the table top. That's always seemed to be enough. Never had a problem with it. Even carbonation throughout.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

truckndad wrote:

I let a couple cups or so get into the keg first, then pour the priming solution in. After the keg in emptied into the priming keg, I put the lid back on and then give the keg a little swirl as I move it from the chair to the table top. That's always seemed to be enough. Never had a problem with it. Even carbonation throughout.

Awesome! Thanks for the details! :chug:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brew City wrote:

Hey truckndad, does the beer get moving pretty well in your bottling keg while you're racking? I've always been meaning to ask you about this. Does your priming solution mix in pretty well by doing this, or do you give it a stir before bottling? I ask, because I never feel like my bottling wands have a great flow rate.

I've always used a plastic hose hooked up to my spigot, which gives me a pretty good flow rate and I can really get some good whirlpool action in the bottling bucket with it. However, I hate cleaning and storing the hose. I might have to give your method a try.

You could take the check valve off the end of the wand and completely control the flow with the spigot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank You, Zobl. I should've mentioned that. I don't have the valve on the wand in that picture. So when I'm transferring the wand isn't directly on the bottom of the keg, it's actually about 1/2 inch up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

truckndad wrote:

Thank You, Zobl. I should've mentioned that. I don't have the valve on the wand in that picture. So when I'm transferring the wand isn't directly on the bottom of the keg, it's actually about 1/2 inch up.

Ahhhh! I thought that you had it sitting just right so the check valve was resting on the bottom. Thanks for bringing that up, Zobl!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why can't you gentley stir in the calculated dissolved sugar
in the ready batch and then fill the bottles? I don't understand
all of the transfering from one pot to the other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

jloftin60 wrote:

Why can't you gentley stir in the calculated dissolved sugar
in the ready batch and then fill the bottles? I don't understand
all of the transfering from one pot to the other.

You would want to transfer in order to prevent too much trub being disturbed back into the beer. If you are not able to give a good stir, you may not get uniform carbination, and might get some off flavors from the dead yeast in the trub if you do stir it up properly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you want to do as little stirring as possible, you risk oxidation. I transfer a little beer to the priming bucket, add the priming solution then the rest of the beer. With the tube at the bottom of the bucket you get a good mix and no oxidation. Another advantage of batch priming are hop teas & flavor additions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

jloftin60 wrote:

Why can't you gentley stir in the calculated dissolved sugar
in the ready batch and then fill the bottles? I don't understand
all of the transfering from one pot to the other.

If you batch prime - do it in another fermenter/bucket/etc. You do not want to stir up the trub that formed in your original fermenter.

For that very reason alone, many homebrewers always transfer to a secondary fermenter after fermentation slows down to get their beer off of that graveyard on the bottom. You don't HAVE to do this.

But you don't want to batch prime out of the same original fermenter without first transferring to a bottling vessel of some sort.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This all sounds pretty easy. However, the part about mixing the priming ingredient into the wort still sounds sketchy.

If I pour sugar into the bottom of a coffee cup, pour coffee, and give it a half-assed stir, the top of the coffee will be unsweetened and the bottom of the cup will be cloyingly sweet.

How do I ensure that sort of non-uniformity does not occur when batch priming?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

I've not noticed any problems from batch priming. It all gets mixed well. I slightly heat some water and honey, or whatever I'm priming with. I put in in as I am transfering it. Heating this *slightly* makes it mix on its own quite well. I put it in after I start the flow into the batch bucket, maybe after about .5 gallon is in the bucket. You don't want to stir, as this can add oxygen to the mix which will cause problems in taste. Oxydation is bad for finish brew.

IMHO, I have not experience this problem (oxyen in brew), it is from info gleaned from the borg. I do find batch priming easy myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BugLaden wrote:

This all sounds pretty easy. However, the part about mixing the priming ingredient into the wort still sounds sketchy.

If I pour sugar into the bottom of a coffee cup, pour coffee, and give it a half-assed stir, the top of the coffee will be unsweetened and the bottom of the cup will be cloyingly sweet.

How do I ensure that sort of non-uniformity does not occur when batch priming?

The answer is that you don't pour the sugar into the beer in it's solid form. Boil some water, then add your honey or sugar to the water to dissolve/dilute it. Cool that mixture down to the same temp as your beer and then pour that in.

A soft, gentle stir to mix up the solution will not hurt your beer. Aggressively stirring and causing bubbles, etc. will introduce oxygen and that is not desired.

Does that help?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll be bottling tonight using batch priming. Bought a MB keg just for batch priming purpose.

Using the priming calculator from screwy brewer my 2 gal of cinnamon spice pale ale will need 13.3 tsp of corn sugar, which works out to a 1/4 cup + 2 tsp....thank goodness for the internet and online calculators...

I plan on mixing my corn sugar into 1/2 cup of boiling water and then letting it cool as I do my cleaning, sanitizing, and other make-ready...

I bought the locking spigot(s) and a bottling wand.


I'll let a gallon of wort go into the priming keg, add in my cooled priming mixture, top off with the rest of the wort...gentle swirl or two then let the bottling begin.

Then since I'll be in the groove I'll whip up my next batch of beer...

I'm torn... Whispering Wheat or Vienna Lager?

I'll figure it out...

Next Friday, I bottle the Wicked Red Ale....

This is fun! :cheer:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BugLaden wrote:

It does - a lot! Sorry for being obtuse. I just want to get the process right!

No apologies needed. We've all asked the same questions.

One day, I'm on here giving advice like this to newer folks and the next I'm posting a thread asking how to do something else myself.

We take care of our own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gunslinger wrote:

I'll be bottling tonight using batch priming. Bought a MB keg just for batch priming purpose.

Next time you're in WalMart, go to the housewares section (I know, but do it anyway). Buy one of the 2.5 gallon slimlines. They run about $6 or $7.

Use that for batch priming and now you've got an extra fermenter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bpgreen wrote:

Gunslinger wrote:

I'll be bottling tonight using batch priming. Bought a MB keg just for batch priming purpose.

Next time you're in WalMart, go to the housewares section (I know, but do it anyway). Buy one of the 2.5 gallon slimlines. They run about $6 or $7.

Use that for batch priming and now you've got an extra fermenter.

If used as a fermenter how are you venting the slim line!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BadHorsie wrote:

bpgreen wrote:

Gunslinger wrote:

I'll be bottling tonight using batch priming. Bought a MB keg just for batch priming purpose.

Next time you're in WalMart, go to the housewares section (I know, but do it anyway). Buy one of the 2.5 gallon slimlines. They run about $6 or $7.

Use that for batch priming and now you've got an extra fermenter.

If used as a fermenter how are you venting the slim line!

I meant that he's now got a fermenter that he's using for batch priming. If he gets a slimline for batch priming, he won't need to use the second fermenter for priming and can use it for fermenting instead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...