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kDick91

2 Hellenbock not going too hot...

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So this is my 3rd beer to make, but the first two have just been standard refills that I changed the recipe to. They turned out pretty much perfect. I was making the Hellenbock, which I started about a month ago and everytime I go to check the beer, it is real funky. Still REALLY cloudy and just has a nasty taste... I had kept it in my kitchen (always out of light) but I noticed the temp was always 78-82, so I moved it (mid-fermentation) to my closet where it now sits at 70-78. More often at 74. But did I kill the yeast or just get a bad pack? Where do I go from here? The instructions say 2 weeks in fermenter, so I figure that it should have done something by now. Any help is greatly appreciated! By the way, glad to be part of the community!

Kyle

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Hi Kyle,

Am I reading that right in that the beer has been in the keg for month? The rule of thumb is to not let it sit on the trub for any longer than 3 weeks or you risk introducing some off-flavors. At some point, it will actually turn into a soapy taste as the chemical reactions change (somebody smarter can add more details).

The temps you mention are definitely high and can account for off-taste/smells, too.

Can you describe what "nasty" means?

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See, I have been trying to describe the nasty to myself, but it is just a really sharp 'bad' taste... I usually have NO problem describing taste, but this just tastes... Rank... But after 2wks I kept checking it every other day. Something in this batch is really off, I'm just gonna have to ditch it. But I appreciate the advice, and if anyone can say for certain what it was, please let me know! I feel the high temps are what killed it...

Thanks!

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the consensus is you should never pour out a batch until you bottle it and let it condition, in hopes that it might turn out good in the end.

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Keep in mind that most times we'll tell you to bottle it and wait before just ditching it.

If it tastes infected or rancid, that's another story. If it tastes sharp, bold, sweet, etc. that can usually be cured with time in the bottle.

See if this resource helps determine what you are tasting and the possible cause.

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Just remembered I used unfiltered tap water... Hm... But rancid is definitely closest to whatever the taste is. Most odd tastes I can just identify and shrug off. I can't swallow this beer it is so bad.

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Please observe a moment of silence for our fallen comrades.

Now raise a home brew as a sign of solidarity.
:gulp:

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Yeah, I've said numerous times to never ever toss a batch before bottling and conditioning, but this one may not be worth it.

::whistles Taps quietly and somberly::

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Well, now that my poor Hellenbock is gone, what would suggest next. I LOVE bocks of nearly all shapes and sizes and IPAs, but hey. I'm open to everything! (Avoid very dark stouts, my chest isn't that hairy)

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